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College Access Program
The College Access Program (CAP) is a three-week summer enrichment residential program for first-generation college students or students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. The program is open to 9th and 10th graders who have completed their high school academic year. Students must be completing their freshman or sophomore year in high school when applying (e.g., only rising sophomores and juniors are eligible). Students must have a minimum 2.75 GPA and course work which will prepare them for college.
Graduate and Professional Students with Disabilities Initiative
The Graduate and Professional Students with Disabilities Initiative is a student-led group that offers a confidential environment to support GPSD in their academic and professional lives. Disabilities are understood in the broadest possible terms and students do not need to be registered with the McBurney Disability Resource Center to contribute to this group. We feel it’s easier to talk to people who are our peers, to experiment with issues that concern us and develop professional skills. As fellow grads, we can support each other in the effort to resolve obstacles, in a low-stakes context, and then communicate more confidently with institutional stakeholders. We are a safe place for people with disabilities to talk about their experiences in navigating the university. We discuss challenges related to our roles, and to school policies and procedures, while facilitating communication with allies and resources. Our long-term institutional goal is to work with other graduate and professional groups at UW to create a honeycomb network so that students may be resources to other students and encourage a give-and-take of ideas and opinions, following the University’s guiding principle.
"How our identities emerge from our struggles" Andrew Solomon
13th Documentary Viewing
In January 2018, the Office of Student Financial Aid began hosting weekly sessions on a variety of different topics that we have dubbed – Coffee & Conversations. The entire team is encouraged to attend if the topic interests them and their schedule allows. The documentary 13th was viewed during the Coffee & Conversations session on March 28, 2017. After the viewing, team members were encouraged to discuss their thoughts and brainstorm how our services could be altered from what had been learned from the documentary.
2017 Legal Education Opportunities Banquet
The LEO Banquet is an event where the Law School community celebrates it's LEO Program and commitment to diversity. Each year the event is hosted by one of our 5 LEO student organizations. The 2017 event was hosted by our Middle Eastern Law Students Association.
A Place At The Table
An opportunity for students to build community via sharing a free meal together at the Multicultural Student Center.
A Place At The Table
An opportunity for students to build community via sharing a free meal together at the Multicultural Student Center.
Academic Coaching and Tutoring Services-Formerly known as Academic Support Services
Tutoring was founded with TRIO in 1994 and was removed from TRIO/CeO in 2014 to expand to DDEEA programs (CeO, PEOPLE, POSSE, First Wave). Later in 2014 Pathways was added to the group as a pilot service. In the Fall of 2015 Power Knapps, and Chancellors Scholars was added to the group and the Academic Support Services was established ; Africa Lozano, Mollyjo Bautch, Nyesha Brown were first Cohort with DDEEA student interns; Robin Murphy, Africa Lozano, Jose Torres were first cohort that transitioned from tutoring in TRIO/CeO to DDEEA. In Fall of 2016, Badger Beginnings was another program that was added to the Division of Diversity, Equity and Educational Achievement and provided services to students. By Fall of 2016, Academic Support Services was providing support to students in 7 programs ( CeO, PEOPLE, POSSE, FIRST WAVE, POWER KNAPPS, CHANCELLORS SCHOLARS, BADGER BEGINNINGS). Badger beginnings is no longer part of the division. McNair scholars program was added to the DDEEA in the spring of 2019 and considered the 7th program ACTS serves.
Academic Coaching and Tutoring Services-Formerly known as Academic Support Services
Tutoring was founded with TRIO in 1994 and was removed from TRIO/CeO in 2014 to expand to DDEEA programs (CeO, PEOPLE, POSSE, First Wave). Later in 2014 Pathways was added to the group as a pilot service. In the Fall of 2015 Power Knapps, and Chancellors Scholars was added to the group and the Academic Support Services was established ; Africa Lozano, Mollyjo Bautch, Nyesha Brown were first Cohort with DDEEA student interns; Robin Murphy, Africa Lozano, Jose Torres were first cohort that transitioned from tutoring in TRIO/CeO to DDEEA. In Fall of 2016, Badger Beginnings was another program that was added to the Division of Diversity, Equity and Educational Achievement and provided services to students. By Fall of 2016, Academic Support Services was providing support to students in 7 programs ( CeO, PEOPLE, POSSE, FIRST WAVE, POWER KNAPPS, CHANCELLORS SCHOLARS, BADGER BEGINNINGS). Badger beginnings is no longer part of the division. McNair scholars program was added to the DDEEA in the spring of 2019 and considered the 7th program ACTS serves.
Academic coaching End of the Fall Semester Study Jam- Steenbock Biocommons
End of the Fall Semester Study Jam at the Biocommons in Steenbok Library. The study jam encourages a welcoming, warm environment for DDEEA students to study together, 1;1 while also eating diverse food at a convenient time that works for the DDEEA students, STEM students and new students to the biocommons.
Academic Coaching End of the Fall Semester Study Jam-MSC
End of the Semester Study Jam at the Multicultural Student Center in the Red Gym. The study jam encourages a welcoming, warm environment for DDEEA students to study together, 1;1 while also eating diverse food at a convenient time that works for the DDEEA students, STEM students and new students to the red Gym.
Academic Coaching End of the Fall Semester Study Jam-MSC
End of the Semester Study Jam at the Multicultural Student Center in the Red Gym. The study jam encourages a welcoming, warm environment for DDEEA students to study together, 1;1 while also eating diverse food at a convenient time that works for the DDEEA students, STEM students and new students to the red Gym.
Academic Coaching End of the Spring Semester Study Jam- Steenbock Biocommons
End of the Spring Semester Study Jam at the Biocommons in Steenbok Library. The study jam encourages a welcoming, warm environment for DDEEA students to study together, 1;1 while also eating diverse food at a convenient time that works for the DDEEA students, STEM students and new students to the biocommons
Academic Coaching End of the Spring Semester Study Jam-MSC
End of the Semester Study Jam at the Multicultural Student Center in the Red Gym in the Spring semester. The study jam encourages a welcoming, warm environment for DDEEA students to study together, 1;1 while also eating diverse food at a convenient time that works for the DDEEA students, STEM students and new students to the red Gym.
Academic Support End of the Semester Study Jam
End of the semester Study Jam at the Biocommons
ACTS Academic Skills Workshops
ACTS provides Academic skills workshops for students in the Division of Diversity Equity and Educational Achievement to support and strengthen academic skills in courses.
Adult Role Models in Science
The core of the ARMS program is run through a course called Service with Youth in STEM, a course open to all students. This community-based learning class is designed to give UW students the communication and social awareness skills they need to collaborate with partners in a culturally diverse community. Students experience both the on- and off-campus Madison communities by partnering with after-school science clubs in the Madison area. ARMS partnerships are made in collaboration with Madison Schools and Community Recreation (MSCR) and the City of Madison, and aim to assist underserved and underrepresented groups of students. Additional ARMS programs run in collaboration with area colleges and community groups.
Adult Role Models in Science
The core of the ARMS program is run through a course called Service with Youth in STEM, a course open to all students. This community-based learning class is designed to give UW students the communication and social awareness skills they need to collaborate with partners in a culturally diverse community. Students experience both the on- and off-campus Madison communities by partnering with after-school science clubs in the Madison area. ARMS partnerships are made in collaboration with Madison Schools and Community Recreation (MSCR) and the City of Madison, and aim to assist underserved and underrepresented groups of students. Additional ARMS programs run in collaboration with area colleges and community groups.
African beading Workshop
African Dancing
African Drumming Workshop
Alternative Break Service Trip to Atlanta, GA
Alt Breaks Trip to Atlanta GA where students worked with refugees
Alternative Break Service Trip to McAllen, TX
Alternative Break Service Trip to McAllen, TX working on immigration
American Indian Studies in Wisconsin
Description: This session will provide an overview of the history, culture, and tribal sovereignty of each of the American Indian nations and tribal communities located in the state of Wisconsin. The session will also highlight accurate and authentic instructional resources for teaching and learning about Wisconsin American Indian nations and tribal communities. Participants will examine why it is important to generate a deeper and more complex understanding of human diversity issues and concerns, particularly in regards to American Indian peoples, in a society that is continually changing. Speaker: David O’Connor (American Indian Studies Consultant, Department of Public Instruction)
American Talent Initiative
Increase enrollment of low-moderate income students by 50,000 by 2025. Through a data-sharing, engagement, public awareness, and shared practices with member institutions. We are one of 20 public institutions who are members of ATI.
An evening with Eileen Collins
An Evening with Nyle DiMarco
Art Exhibition by Nathan Fritz
art exhibition
Art Exhibition of artwork by CHEN CHENG-PO
Art Exhibition of artwork by CHEN CHENG-PO, Taiwanese Painter 1895-1947
Art Exhibition of artwork by VSA [artists with disabilities]
Artist in Residency for Kathy A. Perkins
The Department of Afro-American Studies and our co-sponsors, the Program in Interdisciplinary Theatre Studies, Division of the Arts, and the Department of African Cultural Studies are seeking funding to bring Kathy A. Perkins, an internationally renowned lighting designer and theatre historian to the UW-Madison Campus for a ten-day artist residency beginning Wednesday, February 13, 2019 through February 22, 2019. We’re requesting $1,000 the toward an honorarium of $4,000. (We are seeking $3,000 from the Anonymous Fund). Ms. Perkins will take care of her own lodging and other expenses. The Department of African Cultural Studies has agreed to cover her round-trip airfare). Ms. Perkins’ residency is part of an initiative by the Department of Afro-American Studies to collaborate with colleagues in other departments to increase visibility on campus and in the community of women theatre artists who have managed to break through the barriers of race and gender discrimination that persist in theater and the performing arts and have created their own institutions.
Asian Pacific Islander American Heritage Month
The purpose of APIAHM is to celebrate the history and heritage of Asian Pacific Islander American, and promote cultural appreciation and community partnerships. These are the initiatives that were occurred during the heritage month of 2016. April 2 Colors of the Spring, Spring Formal with Korean American Student Association (KASA), Vietnamese Student Association (VSA) & Hmong American Student Association (HASA) April 3 APIAHM Potluck April 6 Hmong ‘Good’ Space: Territorialities and Networks April 8 Hmong Language Culture Night April 9 Asian American Intervarsity Faith (AAIV) vs Asian American Identity and Activism: Competitors or Complements? Seminar April 14 Kabzaug Vaj: Building a Better World: Organizing for Social Change April 15 Rated P: Kamayan (Potluck) April 16 FASO Presents: Rated P: Workshops April 16 Korean Culture Day with AAIV, KASA & Families through Korean Adoption April 16 India Student Association Presents: HOLI 2016 April 26 Hmong Memory at the Crossroads Film April 26 International Student Services Presents: Tohoku Tomo April 28 Chi Sigma Tau Presents: Activation: Education, Empowering & Activating APIs at UW-Madison April 29 Lao and Hmong and the CIA Connection Film April 29 HASA Presents: Above the Noise April 30 HASA D/Evolution of Hmong Americans Conference April 30 VSA’s Senior Reception May 6 Journalism Opportunity by the 3HmongTV May 6 Southeast Asian American Graduation Reception May 7 APIAHM Closing Reception
Asian Pacific Islander Social
Awake: A Dream from Standing Rock (2017) (TFPE Film Festival)
Badger Athletics Affinity Groups
There are 3 Badger Athletic's Affinity Groups: 1) Badgers Beyond Borders - for international student-athletes 2) MSAU (Minority Student-Athlete Union) - for minority student-athletes 3) Badger Pride - for LGBTQ+ student-athletes The focus areas for each group are: 1) Community Building - each affinity groups sets out to connect student-athletes with students who identify like them, through one of their most salient identities. 2) Personal Development - over the course of the year, student-athletes engage in formal, and informal discussion and reflection about their personal development related to being a part of an underrepresented group on campus, and in the broader society. 3) Campus Affiliate Connection - each affinity group is tasked with connecting with, and engaging with their campus affiliate. (i.e. Badgers Beyond Borders planned an event that connect them with the ISS (International Student-Services) on campus.
Bassem Youssef
BCC Black Student Orientation
BCC Test Anxiety & Study Skills Workshop
bias prevention and holistic review training for staff members
professional development and training in the areas of bias prevention and holistic review processes as related to myriad student activities, including admissions and scholarship committees
BioCommons Tutorial Support Program
Hired tutors to provide small group exam preparation for students enrolled in foundation upper level science courses Biochemistry 501, Microbiology 303, and Genetics 466. The goal was to develop a consistent community of study group attendees to have regular question and answer time in a consistent space to help address a commonly expressed concern, particularly for URM or first generation students, of difficulty navigating the process for getting help and finding others to study with. Facilitators met with the groups for exam preparation, and course material review.
Black Cultural Center Dedication Ceremony
Black History Month Keynote: Nikki Giovanni
Black History Month Planning Kickoff Meeting
Black Joy with Issa Rae
Black Student-Athlete Summit
Student- athletes and athletic staff had the opportunity to travel to Austin, TX to participate in the third annual Black Student-Athlete Summit.The summit is a three-day gathering to openly examine and candidly discuss the numerous and complex issues surrounding the black student-athlete. Scholars, coaches, conference commissioners, athletic directors, academic advisors, student affairs professionals, principals, present and former student-athletes, journalists, and others attend the conference.
Black/African American Social
Blind Boys of Alabama
Boys & Girls Club of Dane County Work Program
Providing a student employment experience which is directly tied to future career growth. This is a funding partnership between the OSFA and the Boys & Girls Club.
CALS Department Diversity Representatives
Each CALS academic department was asked to select a faculty member to serve as Department Diversity Representative. These individuals will serve two year terms, and are responsible for facilitating discussion and initiatives relating to diversity and climate within their departments. The goal is for each department to engage in meaningful assessment and training to address needs relating to faculty, staff, and students within their departments. Examples of initiatives departments have taken are to invite training activities, such as doing the Implicit Bias workshop by WISELI, or creating a standing agenda item for department meetings relating to diversity. Some are initiating staff hiring policies. The reps meet twice a semester to share best practices.
CALS Lunch and Learn Series
Beginning in the Spring 2017 semester, the CALS Equity and Diversity Committee sponsored a series of presentations designed to highlight and inform attendees on issues related to diversity and climate. Presentation topics included Responding to Microaggressions, The Impact of Social Media on Culture, Updates on Mental Health Issues, Mapping Social Identity, Power, and Privilege, and Promoting Success for Underrepresented Students in STEM Classes. The outreach was targeted at faculty and staff in the college to better inform the impact of their work on students from underrepresented populations, and to be aware of issues when planning activities. We expect this program to continue for 2017-18.
CALS Lunch and Learn Series
Beginning in the Spring 2017 semester, the CALS Equity and Diversity Committee sponsored a series of presentations designed to highlight and inform attendees on issues related to diversity and climate. Presentation topics included Responding to Microaggressions, The Impact of Social Media on Culture, Updates on Mental Health Issues, Mapping Social Identity, Power, and Privilege, and Promoting Success for Underrepresented Students in STEM Classes. The outreach was targeted at faculty and staff in the college to better inform the impact of their work on students from underrepresented populations, and to be aware of issues when planning activities. We expect this program to continue for 2017-18.
CALS Outreach Days
We partner with organizations and schools that serve predominantly underrepresented student populations, and provide immersion experiences for students to engage in hands on activities designed to introduce them to topics focused on in CALS. This is accomplished by bringing these groups to campus, and allowing our students, faculty, and staff to engage them in meaningful dialogue and activity to show them what we do, and present information about the potential for them to pursue similar pathways.
CALS PEOPLE
Presentation to high school students in the CALS PEOPLE program about a career in veterinary medicine
CALS Summer Collaboration with PEOPLE Program
CALS has provided summer internship opportunities for rising seniors who are part of the PEOPLE Program. We introduce them to areas of research we engage, and allow them hands on mentoring experiences with our faculty, staff, and students over a 5-6 week period. We hope these students, if admitted and come to UW-Madison, will consider CALS majors.
CALS Summer Collaboration with PEOPLE Program
CALS has provided summer internship opportunities for rising seniors who are part of the PEOPLE Program. We introduce them to areas of research we engage, and allow them hands on mentoring experiences with our faculty, staff, and students over a 5-6 week period. We hope these students, if admitted and come to UW-Madison, will consider CALS majors.
Camp Badger Exploring Engineering
Camp Badger is a one-week, residential program for Wisconsin and Minnesota teenagers entering 8th grade in the fall. As a camper, you will explore many types of engineering fields and see how they can lead to great careers—while living in a student dorm and experiencing life on a college campus.
Campus and Community Liaisons
The offices of the CCLs are tasked with promoting shared values of diversity and inclusion, improving coordination of campus diversity planning, engaging the campus leadership for diversity and inclusion to be culturally responsive to the needs of the American Indian, African American, LatinX/ChicanX and Southeast Asian American communities, improving institutional access through elective recruitment of diverse students, faculty, staff, and through relationship building with the wider communities and improving institutional success through improved retention of students. The four offices housed in the Division of Diversity , Equity and Educational Achievement are the African American Campus and Community Liaison, American Indian Campus and Community Liaison, ChicanX/LatinX Campus and Community Liaison and Southeast Asian American Campus and Community Liaison. Major initiatives from our offices include Black History Month(Feb), ChinX/LatinX Heritage Month(Sep 15- Oct 15), Native November(Nov), Southeast Asian American Heritage Month(April), MLK Day of Services, Latino Youth Summit,and the On Wisconsin Annual Spring Powwow.
Campus Climate site
Website that shares news and information regarding issues related to campus climate
Campus Climate site
Website that shares news and information regarding issues related to campus climate
Campus Conversations
Carmen High School in Milwaukee outreach
Presentation on a career in veterinary medicine to high school students at Carmen High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Center for Cultural Enrichment
The University of Wisconsin-Madison values a diverse community where all members are able to participate fully in the Wisconsin Experience. Therefore, in University Housing, one of our priorities is to establish inclusive, respectful and caring communities. One of the ways in which we do this is through programming and resources provided by staff at the Center for Cultural Enrichment.
Center for Educational Opportunity
The Center for Educational Opportunity (CeO) is a diverse, multifaceted, federally and state-funded program that strives to create equal opportunities in higher education. CeO promotes access to resources, academic achievement and personal growth for students whose parents have not received a four-year degree, students who meet specific federal family income guidelines, and students with documented disabilities. CeO is comprised of the federally-funded TRIO Student Support Services (SSS) and Student Support Services-STEM (SSS-STEM) Programs and the state-funded Academic Success and Achievement Program (ASAP). The overall mission of CeO is to increase access, retention, and graduation rates at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for CeO Scholars. In order to achieve this, CeO Advisors and Staff embrace a personal approach and provide support in every aspect of the student’s path to achievement and success.
Center for Educational Opportunity
The Center for Educational Opportunity (CeO) is a diverse, multifaceted, federally and state-funded program that strives to create equal opportunities in higher education. CeO promotes access to resources, academic achievement and personal growth for students whose parents have not received a four-year degree, students who meet specific federal family income guidelines, and students with documented disabilities. CeO is comprised of the federally-funded TRIO Student Support Services (SSS) and Student Support Services-STEM (SSS-STEM) Programs and the state-funded Academic Success and Achievement Program (ASAP). The overall mission of CeO is to increase access, retention, and graduation rates at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for CeO Scholars. In order to achieve this, CeO Advisors and Staff embrace a personal approach and provide support in every aspect of the student’s path to achievement and success.
Center for Educational Opportunity - Mentoring
Mentoring program for first year CeO scholars.
Center for Educational Opportunity - Mentoring
Mentoring program for first year CeO scholars.
Center for Educational Opportunity Graduation Reception
The graduation reception is a celebration of the degree completion of center participants. Center participants, their families, campus partners, and individuals or groups that have had an impact on the success of the graduate are invited to attend.
Center for Educational Opportunity Graduation Reception
The graduation reception is a celebration of the degree completion of center participants. Center participants, their families, campus partners, and individuals or groups that have had an impact on the success of the graduate are invited to attend.
Center for Educational Opportunity Graduation Reception
The graduation reception is a celebration of the degree completion of center participants. Center participants, their families, campus partners, and individuals or groups that have had an impact on the success of the graduate are invited to attend.
Chancellor's Scholarship Program
The Chancellor's Scholarship Program is a highly selective program that was established in 1984 for academically outstanding and talented ethnic minority and under-represented students who had the potential to excel in a highly rigorous academic environment. It takes a high touch approach in working with Scholars where engagement in an array of academic, leadership and service activities is an integral part of the CS Program structure. The program has a philosophy of excellence in scholarship, leadership and service that is reflected in the individual accomplishments of Scholars and the program.
Chancellor's Scholarship Program
The Chancellor's Scholarship Program is a highly selective program that was established in 1984 for academically outstanding and talented ethnic minority and under-represented students who had the potential to excel in a highly rigorous academic environment. It takes a high touch approach in working with Scholars where engagement in an array of academic, leadership and service activities is an integral part of the CS Program structure. The program has a philosophy of excellence in scholarship, leadership and service that is reflected in the individual accomplishments of Scholars and the program.
Chancellor's Scholarship Program
The Chancellor's Scholarship Program is a highly selective program that was established in 1984 for academically outstanding and talented ethnic minority and under-represented students who had the potential to excel in a highly rigorous academic environment. It takes a high touch approach in working with Scholars where engagement in an array of academic, leadership and service activities is an integral part of the CS Program structure. The program has a philosophy of excellence in scholarship, leadership and service that is reflected in the individual accomplishments of Scholars and the program.
Chancellor's and Powers-Knapp Scholars Ethnic Fest
Chancellor's and Powers-Knapp Scholarship Recipients work together to understand each other's backgrounds and cultures, which culminates in an evening of sharing what they learned through project presentations. Additionally, scholars use Ethnic Fest as an opportunity to give back to the community. Over 50 pounds of pop tabs are donated to the Ronald McDonald House Charities, over 100 pounds of non-perishable food items were donated to St. Vincent DePaul of Madison, and a Penny War between classes $380 dollars for their class-selected charity.
Chancellor's and Powers-Knapp Scholars Family Weekend
Chicanx Latinx Heritage Month
A month long celebration of events, programs, workshops, and community gatherings that celebrate Chicanx Latinx Heritage Month from Sept 15-Oct 15
College Access Program
The College Access Program (CAP) is a three-week summer enrichment residential program for first-generation college students or students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. The program is open to 9th and 10th graders who have completed their high school academic year.
College Scholar Advisory Board Community Building
The College Scholar Advisory Board serves as a platform for strengthening the overall student involvement within PEOPLE. One of its core purpose is to provide PEOPLE Scholars with opportunities to build community within each cohort and across cohorts.
College Scholar Advisory Board Community Building
The College Scholar Advisory Board serves as a platform for strengthening the overall student involvement within PEOPLE. One of its core purpose is to provide PEOPLE Scholars with opportunities to build community within each cohort and across cohorts.
Comeback Carnival
Community Engagement Preparation
- Hired Community Engagement Preparation Specialist to develop materials and initiatives that enhance student preparedness for community-engaged learning/work, with a specific focus on cultural humility and understanding of power and privilege - Increased amount of Community-based learning interns to support student preparation and community understanding in CBL courses - Implemented the Student Organization Partnership Program to support cultural preparation efforts of select student organizations - Support the Civic Action Plan, specifically recommendations related to diversity in hiring/admission and retention
Compania Flamenca Jose Porcel Dance
Dance Performance
Creating Transformational Diversity Goals
The Libraries at the University of Wisconsin-Madison are dedicated to the practices of social justice, diversity, equality, and respect among our staff, students, collections, and services. We strive to overcome historical and divisive biases in our society and embrace diverse points of view as assets to the fabric of our community. All employees are called on to contribute to building this environment (See directions - page 12) We are providing this training opportunity to equip all staff to develop actionable personal diversity and inclusion goals. While the shared expectation is specific to GLS employees, all campus libraries’ staff may benefit from this information and all are welcome to attend. Agenda: 1. Setting transformational diversity goals (Jeff Witt, Diversity & Inclusion Specialist at University of Michigan Library) - 45 minutes 2. Shared diversity and inclusion expectation (Ann Murphy-Lom, GLS HR) - 5 minutes 3. Workshopping writing goals (EDC-Training & Education Committee) - 20 minutes
Crossroads BBQ
Crossroads BBQ
Cultural Competency Lunch and Learn Series Fall 2016
The 2016-17 Cultural Competency series was designed to educate School of Nursing faculty and staff around issues of diversity, equity and inclusion throughout the academic year. September 9: Building Inclusive and Diverse Classrooms • September 16: Health Disparities in Dane County: Race to Equity Report revisited • October 7: Power, Privilege, and Microaggressions: Multicultural Student Center • October 21: Go Big Read Book Discussion: Evicted • November 11: Transgender Health: Transgender Health Coalition • November 18: WISELI (Women in Science and Engineering Leadership Institute): Hiring and Unconscious Bias • December 2: UW Health Career Pathways and Workforce Development through an Equity Lens. January 27, 2017 - Advancing Health Equity: David Williams, PhD, MPH Web Presentation February 10, 2017 - PATCH (Providers and Teens Communicating for Health) February 24, 2017 - Racial and Health Equity within the Wisconsin Department of Public Health March 10, 2017 - Affordable Care Act: Post-Election Updates from Covering Wisconsin March 17, 2017 - Race to Equity Roadmap Update with Erica Nelson April 14, 2017 - Diversity in Nursing Research April 28, 2017 - Literacy Network panel: Native and Non-native English
Culture and comedy with the Muslim Student Association
Day of the Arts
At its heart, Day of the Arts is a recruitment activity aimed at those students whose talents and passions are in the creative arts. We hope to encourage this often overlooked group of students to pursue their dreams of being an artist, musician or dancer. In addition, this program enables students to see how the University can help them achieve these goals while providing faculty and staff a way to connect with and identify potential students.
Day of the Arts 2017
At its heart, Day of the Arts is a recruitment activity aimed at those students whose talents and passions are in the creative arts. We hope to encourage this often overlooked group of students to pursue their dreams of being an artist, musician or dancer. In addition, this program enables students to see how the University can help them achieve these goals while providing faculty and staff a way to connect with and identify potential students.
DDEEA BST MCOD Strategic Planning
DDEEA Business Services Team utilizing the Multicultural Organization Development Tool to explore how HR and Business Services intersects with multiculturalism, access, inclusion, equity, engagement, and diversity; and how to make our policies, procedures, and programs more culturally responsive and inclusive. Additionally, we will identify how we can positively impact our student internship programming to come up with new and innovative ideas and approaches to student employment, working closely with our RPA and internship program developer.
DDEEA Graduation Recognition
Opportunity for students in DDEEA programs to have individual recognition at graduation.
DDEEA Graduation Recognition
Opportunity for students in DDEEA programs to have individual recognition at graduation.
DDEEA Graduation Recognition 18
Opportunity for students in DDEEA programs to have individual recognition at graduation.
DDEEA Kickback
Divisional Students and Staff gather and discuss common expectations for students. There are announcements, food, and games.
DDEEA Kickback 2017
Divisional Students and Staff gather and discuss common expectations for students. There are announcements, food, and games.
Departmental Brown Bag lunches
Brings faculty and students, particularly students of color, together to provide support and professional development to one another.
Dinner with Faculty - April
Multicultural Affairs hosts a monthly dinner with a guest speaker from the health care professions. This gives an opportunity for current students to network with faculty and potentially form mentor relationships.
Dinner with Faculty - March
Multicultural Affairs hosts a monthly dinner with a guest speaker from the health care professions. This gives an opportunity for current students to network with faculty and potentially form mentor relationships.
Dinner with Faculty - November
Multicultural Affairs hosts a monthly dinner with a guest speaker from the health care professions. This gives an opportunity for current students to network with faculty and potentially form mentor relationships.
Dinner with Faculty - October
Multicultural Affairs hosts a monthly dinner with a guest speaker from the health care professions. This gives an opportunity for current students to network with faculty and potentially form mentor relationships.
Dinner with Faculty - September
Multicultural Affairs hosts a monthly dinner with a guest speaker from the health care professions. This gives an opportunity for current students to network with faculty and potentially form mentor relationships.
Disability Accommodation for Employees
The University of Wisconsin–Madison is committed to providing a workplace for our employees where they can be successful. This includes providing reasonable accommodations in order for qualified employees or applicants with disabilities to have equal employment opportunities. Employees with disabilities can make a request for a reasonable accommodation if they are having difficulty performing duties if their job or accessing a benefit of employment due to limitations from a disability or chronic medical condition. Please see the Employee Disability Accommodation website for more information:https://oed.wisc.edu/employee-disability-accommodation.htm
Diversity and Inclusion webinar
attended this webinar which focused on learning disabilities, neurocognitive inference and veterinary medicine and discussion within the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) curriculum on accommodations in individual courses and learning environments.
Diversity Dialogue
Diversity Forum
A two day event with keynote speaker and breakout sessions, similar to a conference.
Diversity Forum 2nd & 3rd Shift
An event to discuss diversity issues for 2nd and 3rd shift employees.
Diversity Forum 2nd & 3rd Shift
An event to discuss diversity issues for 2nd and 3rd shift employees.
Diversity Forum 2nd & 3rd Shift
An event to discuss diversity issues for 2nd and 3rd shift employees.
Diversity Inventory Program
DIP is a searchable online database that will collect, update, and report information on diversity related activities, i.e., programs, events, support services, and research across campus
Diversity Inventory Program
DIP is a searchable online database that will collect, update, and report information on diversity related activities, i.e., programs, events, support services, and research across campus
Diversity Resident Librarian Program
Established in 2013, this residency provides entry level librarians from diverse backgrounds an opportunity to develop skills and professional growth in academic librarianship. The program is designed to meet both the professional goals and interests of the Resident as well as the service and operational priorities of the Library. The program supports the goals of the Association of Research Libraries Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce. From 2013-2016, the residency was a two-year program. Beginning in 2017, the residency has been expanded to a three-year program. Year one will include a placement in College Library, the library with primary service to undergraduates, to give the resident a firm foundation in academic librarianship with experience in reference, instruction, and collection development. After the first year, when the resident also gets familiar with the large UW-Madison campus and learns about the many different libraries and library services available, a two-year placement in a library will be arranged based on the resident’s interests and the needs and priorities of the libraries. For example, this placement could be at a science library, such as Steenbock Library, or a department such as Special Collections or Archives.
Division of Diversity, Equity, and Educational Achievement Internship Program
he Division of Division of Diversity, Equity & Educational Achievement (DDEEA) Internship Program provides high-impact employment opportunities for students to develop marketable work experience. Interns grow personally and professionally as leaders in diversity and inclusion in a workplace that empowers students to realize their potential and express their identities. Using a cohort model, interns commit to a year-long paid internship, working throughout the division in areas such as: research, communications, human resources, data management, external relations, finance, administration, event coordination, and the Mercile J. Lee Scholarship Program.
Division of Diversity, Equity, and Educational Achievement Internship Program
The Division of Diversity, Equity, and Educational Achievement Internship Program gives students the opportunity to take part in diversity-related work on an administrative level, at a public institution for higher education. The DDEEA Internship Program also creates experiences for students that allow them to grow personally and professionally. Interns develop a focused, creative, fast-paced, organized work ethic, build professional connections across campus, and gain knowledge on the intricate organizational structure of UW-Madison administration. DDEEA interns work in a wide variety of capacities. Each of the 4 Pathways to Educational Achievement coordinators, who specialize in African-American, Latinx, American Indian, and SE Asian American student services, have 1-2 interns. Additionally, individual interns work directly with DDEEA staff who specialize in events, STEM initiatives, business services, and Information Technology. Other interns work more generally in DDEEA offices in Bascom Hall or in the Red Gym and work on individual and group projects, both assigned and self-created. The internship program at OVPCDO gives interns the opportunity to participate in work that makes campus a more inclusive space for their peers & future students of all identity groups. The OVPCDO internship program will give students the tools that they need to become confident, marketable leaders as they enter the professional world upon leaving UW-Madison. Specifically, the program focuses on developing: • Inter-personal communication • Professional etiquette • Project planning & follow through • Organization The last portion of this handbook outlines that specific ways that we will move towards these development goals throughout the year. Some of the most important resources to interns throughout the year will be their mentors, the lead, the programming coordinator & the development coordinator.
Division of Enrollment Management Engagement, Inclusion and Diversity Recharge Team
From August, 2018 to the present, the DEM EID meets monthly for 1.25 hours to connect, build strategy, and engage in the self work necessary to sustain conversations on issues surrounding equity and inclusion. The following committees have been established to implement our work: Onboarding Training and Facilitation Social Justice and Workplace Inclusion Modules Hiring Processes and Procedures Evaluation of EID Activities DEM Employee Data
Division of Enrollment Management Learning Journey
The Division of Enrollment Management (DEM) Engagement, Inclusion and Diversity (EID) Team hosts two to three Learning Journeys each year on topics such as Social Class in America, First Generation College Students, and Micro-aggressions.
Division of Enrollment Management Learning Journey: A Peacock in the Land of Penguins
This event is sponsored by the Enrollment Management EID (Engagement, Inclusion and Diversity) Committee to provide learning and dialogue around diversity and inclusion within the workplace. The participants viewed the video "A Peacock in the Land of Penguins," and focused on self-awareness and our role in building an inclusive workplace and how socialization impacts our lives.
Division of Enrollment Management Learning Journey: Building Our Community: Addressing Microaggressions in the Workplace
A winter Learning Journey sponsored by the DEM EID (Engagement, Inclusion and Diversity) Committee to engage around how we may impact the workplace and inclusivity through indirect, subtle or unintentional acts of bias. We provided an opportunity to reflect on these acts, known as microaggressions, and develop tools and strategies to address them.
Division of Enrollment Management Learning Journey: Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace
The Division of Enrollment Management EID (Engagement, Inclusion and Diversity) Committee hosts Learning Journeys that focus on learning and dialogue around workplace diversity and inclusion.
Division of Enrollment Management Learning Journey: Words Matter: Developing Meaningful Conversations Around Microaggressions
2nd winter Learning Journey sponsored by the EID (Engagement, Inclusion and Diversity) Committee to learn and dialogue around diversity and inclusion. The objective is to build community and to build awareness around microaggressions and how they impact the workplace and inclusivity. The focus was on developing tools and straegies to interrupt microaggressions and to engage in meaningful conversations around giving and receiving feedback.
Education Graduate Research Scholars
Ed-GRS is a community of underrepresented students, including first generation, low income, and/or targeted minority students, who are receiving a Graduate Research Fellowship in the School of Education. In addition to tuition remission, stipend, and heath care benefits, the Ed-GRS program strives to assist fellows with first year transition, community building, and professional development opportunities. Ed-GRS is guided by an advisory committee consisting of staff, faculty, and students. With strong support from the Graduate School and other graduate research scholar communities, the School of Education’s Student Diversity Programs Office is proud to be home for Ed-GRS and looks forward to developing a community a program that will meet the need of our scholars from diverse disciplines.
Education Graduate Research Scholars
Ed-GRS is a community of underrepresented students, including first generation, low income, and/or targeted minority students, who are receiving a Graduate Research Fellowship in the School of Education. In addition to tuition remission, stipend, and heath care benefits, the Ed-GRS program strives to assist fellows with first year transition, community building, and professional development opportunities. Ed-GRS is guided by an advisory committee consisting of staff, faculty, and students. With strong support from the Graduate School and other graduate research scholar communities, the School of Education’s Student Diversity Programs Office is proud to be home for Ed-GRS and looks forward to developing a community a program that will meet the need of our scholars from diverse disciplines.
Edward Alexander Bouchet Graduate Honor Society Induction Ceremony
This event recognizes the new members of the UW-Madison Chapter of the Bouchet Graduate Honor Society. These dissertators and postdoctoral researchers were selected by a review committee based on their ability to exhibit the Bouchet qualities of CLASS (Character, Leadership, Advocacy for traditionally underrepresented students, Scholarship, and Service).
Eid Al Adha Celebration Dinner
Emerging Adulthood Book Series
DART+ (Director’s All-Reports Team + Deputies) read two books on Emerging Adulthood and had a discussion with one of the authors, Christine Whelan. The group focused on how to adjust our services to students as well as to our student employees and FTEs that also fall into this age-related identity.
Employee Disability Resources Office
The UW–Madison Employee Disability Resources (EDR) Office serves as the campuswide hub for information on the disability accommodation process for employees and applicants. We recognize that all UW–Madison applicants and employees with disabilities have a right to ask for a reasonable accommodation, and we advocate for a process to identify if one can be made. We offer essential information, consultation, education, and referral services to employees and applicants, Divisional Disability Representatives (DDRs), and supervisors and managers to help minimize barriers in the workplace. We’re guided by our belief that disability is an important aspect of diversity, and we support full inclusion of individuals with disabilities in all aspects of employment and participation at UW–Madison.
Employee Learning Center
Helps UW- Madison employees (including J-1 visa scholars) identify and work towards educational goals to enhance opportunities for workplace advancement. Areas of instruction may include: English conversation practice and pronunciation. Basic computer skills. Leaning about UW-Madison and American culture. GED / HSED support
Empowering You Career and Internship Conference
The primary objective of the conference is to give students a jumpstart in clarifying their academic goals and connecting their academic work with post-graduation careers and opportunities. Students participate in conference sessions focused on high impact practices that enhance their undergraduate experience and position them to be competitive as high achieving and highly skilled college graduates in our increasingly global economy. All underrepresented L&S students and DDEEA student services programs were invited to participate along with students served by the Pathways team. The event was also marketed to undergraduates in each of the schools and colleges.
Empowering You Career and Internship Conference
The primary objective of the conference is to give students a jumpstart in clarifying their academic goals and connecting their academic work with post-graduation careers and opportunities. Students participate in conference sessions focused on high impact practices that enhance their undergraduate experience and position them to be competitive as high achieving and highly skilled college graduates in our increasingly global economy. All underrepresented L&S students and DDEEA student services programs were invited to participate along with students served by the Pathways team. The event was also marketed to undergraduates in each of the schools and colleges.
Engagement, Inclusivity, Diversity (EID) committee
Committee within the School of Veterinary Medicine (SVM) that actively meets to focus on creating spaces and programming for ongoing dialog related to diversity and inclusivity. Through this committee, the SVM increases the understanding, of its culture, creates opportunities for discussion about diversity issues, provides venues to honor and celebrate differences.
Engagement, Inclusivity, Diversity (EID) committee
Committee within the School of Veterinary Medicine (SVM) that actively meets to focus on creating spaces and programming for ongoing dialog related to diversity and inclusivity. Through this committee, the SVM increases the understanding, of its culture, creates opportunities for discussion about diversity issues, provides venues to honor and celebrate differences.
Enhancing Diversity in the Nursing Workforce Conference
Annual conference to recruit, retain, and invigorate prospective and current nurses from diverse background. The event includes a career fair of healthcare employers who are recruiting diverse nurses, breakout sessions, and a nationally known keynote to address diversity/equity in nursing.
Evicted Book Group
Book group for Union staff and students on the Go Big Read title Evicted
Faculty of Color Reception
Purpose is to recognize new and recently promoted faculty of color and serves as a networking opportunity.
Faculty of Color Reception
Purpose is to recognize new and recently promoted faculty of color and serves as a networking opportunity.
Faculty of Color Reception
Purpose is to recognize new and recently promoted faculty of color and serves as a networking opportunity.
Fair Play
Fair Play staff travel to local and national college campuses to disseminate a workshop on the ills of implicit bias and its effects on students of color in Graduate STEM programs. The workshop is unique in its inclusion of a video game entitled Fair Play. Fair Play provides players with the opportunity to take the perspective of Jamal Davis, a Black graduate student on his way to becoming a renowned professor. In this game, players experience racial bias during interactions with other characters, as well as in the virtual environment. As Jamal, the road to success involves navigating the academic world; as a Black student, bias can steer players off of a successful path. Winning in Fair Play involves learning when and how to name biases. While many will succeed in Fair Play, the true winners are those that learn the reality of bias.
Fall 2016 Social Justice Reading Group
This reading group is a student-facilitated space that will center the experiences and voices of women of color. All are welcome. This reading group is not a survivor support group, and is intended to facilitate dialogue on the content of the book. Referral resources will be available.
Fall Keynote Speaker: Matika Wilbur - Native Photo Project
Festival Series: Mid-autumn Festival with CSSA (Chinese Students and Scholars Association
First Wave
First Wave is a four-year, full-tuition scholarship program and learning community for Hip Hop and Urban Arts. It is grounded in the three pillars that inform all of its programming: Academics, Arts, and Activism.
First Wave Annual Headlining Performance at Boys and Girls Club Keystone Conference
For the past four years, First Wave has been one of the key headliners for one of the largest youth-development conferences in the world, the annual Boys and Girls Clubs Keystone Conference which rotates from city to city each year. In 2016 it was held in Dallas, Texas with over 2500 participants from across the globe.
Gender 101 Training
Gender 101 training provided at All-Team Meeting by Jelani Rivera and Katherine Charek Briggs from the Gender & Sexuality Campus Center. Discussed best practices on using gender pronouns and practiced their usage.
General Library System Diversity Task Force
The General Library System created a Diversity Task Force to plan for a long-term strategic way to manage, integrate and sustain efforts to promote diversity and inclusivity in library staffing and services. The Task Force will work over a year to gather information, set priorities, and recommend a structure for sustained management including assessment and accountability and reporting of diversity efforts in the GLS.
General Library System Website for Equity and Diversity
The Equity & Diversity Committee (EDC) Website Task Force was charged to create a public website for external communication of UW-Madison Libraries information related to diversity & inclusion. In addition, the website requires a system for ongoing updates and ways to refresh the information shared with the public in order to remain current and relevant. We expect that the audience for the website is primarily those with a particular interest in learning about the Libraries’ institutional commitment to diversity. We do not believe that the page is therefore a regular destination, however it is imperative that the content is there and is seen to be given some level of attention and updates.The EDC Task Force also has recommendations for identifying ways that diversity & inclusion issues are represented through the general library web presence, so that the diversity website is not the sole location for that information to be presented. The website is available here: https://www.library.wisc.edu/diversity/
Get Out
Movie offered in Marquee Theater in Union South
Global Gateway - Summer 2018
Providing study abroad experiences to students who through classroom learning, guided trips all around the city, activities and overnight excursions outside of Rio, students explore the history and culture of Brazil through the lens of modernization and globalization. Preference is given to students who have an expected family contribution of $12K or less. This program is funded for summer 2018 by OSFA.
Graduate Assistants Equity Workshops
Launched on 13 October of 1990 as a result of bargaining between the Teaching Assistants’ Association, UW-Madison, and the State of Wisconsin. Currently offered 17 times each academic year for Teaching Assistants, Project/Program Assistants, and Research Assistants. Presented and sponsored by the Office for Equity and Diversity in the Division of Diversity, Equity, and Educational Achievement; the McBurney Disability Resource Center; the Teaching Assistants’ Association; the Office of Compliance; the Division of University Health Services, the Bias Response Team in the Division of Student Life, Employee Assistance Office, Ombuds Office; and the Office of Human Resources. Teaching Assistants cannot be reappointed for more than one semester unless they have completed this professional development workshop. Participants receive information about relevant laws, policies, regulations and resources; explore the practical application of these policies to classroom and learning environments; and engage in conversations designed to promote interdisciplinary dialogue and excellence through diversity. Since 2006, partnered with the Theatre for Cultural and Social Awarenes, (TCSA). The sessions promote the development of competencies that sustain and strengthen UW-Madison's position of preeminence in research and higher education and advance critical campus strategic priorities.
GSVA (Gay Straight Veterinary Alliance) and Broad Spectrum
To provide education and a supportive environment for LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered, Queer and Questioning) students, faculty, staff and friends withing the UW-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine
GSVA (Gay Straight Veterinary Alliance) and Broad Spectrum
To provide education and a supportive environment for LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered, Queer and Questioning) students, faculty, staff and friends withing the UW-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine
Hamilton (The Musical) Study Group
Study Group on the musical Hamilton
Health Careers Family Empowerment Day
This one-day program held each fall gives high school students and their parents (as well as teachers and advisers) an opportunity to learn about what it takes to go into medicine and allied health professions. They hear from current students in the Schools of Medicine and Public Health, Nursing, and Pharmacy, as well as financial aid and admissions advisers from UW-Madison's undergrad campus.
Health Equity & Social Justice
This is an interprofessional 2-credit elective seminar that is open to any health science student. The course focuses on diversity, equity, and leadership in the health professions in a seminar format. The goal of this seminar is to examine through both the “textbooks of our lives” and scholarly readings, issues of privilege and oppression as they play out in the arenas of ethnicity/race, socioeconomic status/geography/class, gender, sexual orientation, sexual identity, abilities, religion, etc. and how these identities impact our health, health care, and health practice.
Health Equity & Social Justice
Health Equity and Social Justice (SAS490) is an inter-professional 2-credit social justice elective seminar focusing on diversity, equity, and leadership in the health professions. The goal of this seminar is to examine, through the “textbooks of our lives” and scholarly readings, issues of privilege and oppression as they play out in the arenas of ethnic/race, socioeconomic status, gender, sexual orientation, ability, religion, etc. and how these identities impact our health, health care, and health practice. This course is intended primarily for professional students in the Schools of Pharmacy, Nursing, Veterinary Medicine, Population Health, Medicine, and those in allied health programs. Students and facilitators will explore how our own experiences have been shaped and influenced by these identities and how they play out in interactions with patients, colleagues, and community members.
Health Equity Leadership Institute
The Health Equity Leadership Institute is an annual event hosted by the UW Collaborative Center for Health Equity (CCHE) in partnership with academic collaborators from the Maryland Center for Health Equity (M-CHE) at the University of Maryland, College Park.
Health Equity Leadership Institute
The Health Equity Leadership Institute is an annual event hosted by the UW Collaborative Center for Health Equity (CCHE) in partnership with academic collaborators from the Maryland Center for Health Equity (M-CHE) at the University of Maryland, College Park.
Health Equity Leadership Institute
The Health Equity Leadership Institute is an annual event hosted by the UW Collaborative Center for Health Equity (CCHE) in partnership with academic collaborators from the Maryland Center for Health Equity (M-CHE) at the University of Maryland, College Park. In 2017 we hosted a one-day training workshop on Culturally Aware Mentoring for alumni of our HELI program and special invitees and did not have a new HELI cohort.
Health Equity Leadership Institute
The Health Equity Leadership Institute is an annual event hosted by the UW Collaborative Center for Health Equity (CCHE) in partnership with academic collaborators from the Maryland Center for Health Equity (M-CHE) at the University of Maryland, College Park. In 2017 we hosted a one-day training workshop on Culturally Aware Mentoring for alumni of our HELI program and special invitees and did not have a new HELI cohort.
Health Science SEED program
This program examines the issues of privilege and opportunity as they relate to race, ethnicity, gender, class, geography, sexual identity, abilities, religion, etc., and how these identities impact our health, health practice and health care.
Health Science SEED program
This program examines the issues of privilege and opportunity as they relate to race, ethnicity, gender, class, geography, sexual identity, abilities, religion, etc., and how these identities impact our health, health practice and health care.
High school campus visits
Campus visits During a typical campus visit we bring to campus anywhere from 45- 50 high school students. Mostly unrepresented low income and first generation. They send the day learning about the school of education and the majors and programs. They also meet with faculty/graduate students and tour the Art department, Dance, Theater and glass labs. Campus visits are part of our unit’s recruitment strategy. Besides scholarships, the campus visit is your most effective way to reach prospective students and share your message with them and their guidance counselors. In 2016 -17 academic year we hosted 4 campus visits.
Hip Hop in the Heartland
In its twelve year, Hip Hop in the Heartland is Institute that uses hip hop pedagogy as a vehicle for providing educators with culturally relevant curricular tools to successfully navigate the rapidly diversifying classroom and society. It is specifically designed for: Classroom teachers, administrators, guidance counselors, school personnel, community educators, college educators, community leaders, education students, hip hop and spoken word educators and practitioners, and anyone committed to social justice and urban education.
Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration
Musial entertainment and light refreshments were provided to bring awareness to Hispanic Heritage Month.
How does religion impact the student experience--Atheists, Humanists and Agnostics; SIKH; Muslin Student Association; UW Center for Religion and Global Citizenry
I Am Not Your Negro (2016)
IAP Advisor Series Lunch: Study Abroad, Identity, and Diversity
IAP hosts Advisor Series lunches on a variety of topics to share with the larger advising community information pertinent to study abroad. We used past participant information and evaluation comments to share information on how identity can impact study abroad experiences.
Inclusive Career Advising
I will be training a group of Graduate Coordinators through an initiative developed by the Graduate School.
Inclusive Learning Committee
The Inclusive Learning Committee meets on a monthly basis to plan and promote inclusivity initiatives in the division.
Inclusive Learning Committee
The Inclusive Learning Committee meets on a monthly basis to plan and promote inclusivity initiatives in the division.
Inclusive Learning Committee
The Inclusive Learning Committee meets on a monthly basis to plan and promote inclusivity initiatives in the division.
Inclusivity Everyday
The Inclusivity Everyday Program is a multifaceted lifelong learning opportunity for staff and faculty at the Division of Continuing Studies. Inclusivity Everyday offers a framework through which a variety of inclusivity-related Communities of Practice form and function. The program incorporates multiple formats, engagement levels, and entry points so each staff member can take part in conversations about inclusivity at an appropriate and productive level. Guided by this framework, Inclusive Learning Committee members embody and model inclusivity in their personal and professional activities. They also encourage colleagues to consider inclusivity issues in lifelong learning so they may participate in campus and community conversations on the subject.
Inclusivity Everyday
The Inclusivity Everyday Program is a multifaceted lifelong learning opportunity for staff and faculty at the Division of Continuing Studies. Inclusivity Everyday offers a framework through which a variety of inclusivity-related Communities of Practice form and function. The program incorporates multiple formats, engagement levels, and entry points so each staff member can take part in conversations about inclusivity at an appropriate and productive level. Guided by this framework, Inclusive Learning Committee members embody and model inclusivity in their personal and professional activities. They also encourage colleagues to consider inclusivity issues in lifelong learning so they may participate in campus and community conversations on the subject.
Indigenous Health and Wellness day
IHWD brings Native American middle and high school students from Wisconsin and Minnesota to come to the UW-Madison campus for exposure to college and careers in health and science
Information Specialist Internship Program
ISIP provides second and third year undergraduates at the University of Wisconsin-Madison an experiential learning opportunity to obtain knowledge and hands-on experience in the field of information and library services. This programs works to expand the diverse pool of applicants exploring Information Studies as a possible career.
Information Specialist Internship Program
ISIP provides second and third year undergraduates at the University of Wisconsin-Madison an experiential learning opportunity to obtain knowledge and hands-on experience in the field of information and library services. This programs works to expand the diverse pool of applicants exploring Information Studies as a possible career.
Information Specialist Internship Program
ISIP provides second and third year undergraduates at the University of Wisconsin-Madison an experiential learning opportunity to obtain knowledge and hands-on experience in the field of information and library services. This programs works to expand the diverse pool of applicants exploring Information Studies as a possible career.
Information Technology Academy Madison
In alignment with the UW-Madison’s 2014 Diversity Framework, the Information Technology Academy (ITA) provides services to diverse students with the ultimate goal of increasing their matriculation rates at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Through its triple focus on technological literacy, academic preparation, and leadership development, ITA prepares promising students for learning and leadership in the 21st century digital age. ITA serves three communities: Information Technology Academy Madison (ITA Madison), Information Technology Academy Tribal Technology Institute Lac du Flambeau (ITA-TTI), and Information Technology Academy Tribal Technology Institute Oneida (ITA-TTI Oneida). Each year, ITA Madison recruits 30 8th grade students who participate in the program during their four years of high school. ITA Madison students commit to attend the program 18 Saturdays throughout the academic year. During the summer, ITA Madison (9th and 10th graders) attend a two-week commuter camp session. ITA Madison rising 11th-grade students complete at least 60-hours of a paid internship and a summer technology course on UW-Madison's campus. ITA Madison's rising 12th graders participate in a one-week summer residential/overnight camp session on UW-Madison's campus. The technology and college preparation coursework is enhanced by leadership experiences such as a study tour of Silicon Valley technology companies, student council, guest lecturers, resume and cover letter writing workshops, community service outreach, and more. For four years, ITA also provides individual attention to students through counseling, mentoring, and tutoring. Students receive a computer with software as well as access to UW-Madison resources. Students who matriculate at UW-Madison become PEOPLE scholars and receive a full-tuition scholarship. The program is provided at no cost to participants.
Information Technology Academy Madison
In alignment with the UW-Madison’s 2014 Diversity Framework, the Information Technology Academy (ITA) provides services to diverse students with the ultimate goal of increasing their matriculation rates at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Through its triple focus on technological literacy, academic preparation, and leadership development, ITA prepares promising students for learning and leadership in the 21st century digital age. ITA serves three communities: Information Technology Academy Madison (ITA Madison), Information Technology Academy Tribal Technology Institute Lac du Flambeau (ITA-TTI), and Information Technology Academy Tribal Technology Institute Oneida (ITA-TTI Oneida). Each year, ITA Madison recruits 30 8th grade students who participate in the program during their four years of high school. ITA Madison students commit to attend the program 18 Saturdays throughout the academic year. During the summer, ITA Madison (9th and 10th graders) attend a two-week commuter camp session. ITA Madison rising 11th-grade students complete at least 60-hours of a paid internship and a summer technology course on UW-Madison's campus. ITA Madison's rising 12th graders participate in a one-week summer residential/overnight camp session on UW-Madison's campus. The technology and college preparation coursework is enhanced by leadership experiences such as a study tour of Silicon Valley technology companies, student council, guest lecturers, resume and cover letter writing workshops, community service outreach, and more. For four years, ITA also provides individual attention to students through counseling, mentoring, and tutoring. Students receive a computer with software as well as access to UW-Madison resources. Students who matriculate at UW-Madison become PEOPLE scholars and receive a full-tuition scholarship. The program is provided at no cost to participants.
Information Technology Academy Tribal Technology Institute Lac du Flambeau
In alignment with the UW-Madison’s 2014 Diversity Framework, the Information Technology Academy (ITA) provides services to diverse students with the ultimate goal of increasing their matriculation rates at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Through its triple focus on technological literacy, academic preparation, and leadership development, ITA prepares promising students for learning and leadership in the 21st century digital age. ITA serves three communities: Information Technology Academy Madison (ITA Madison), Information Technology Academy Tribal Technology Institute Lac du Flambeau (ITA-TTI Lac du Flambeau), and Information Technology Academy Tribal Technology Institute Oneida (ITA-TTI Oneida). Each year, ITA-TTI Lac du Flambeau recruits 15 9th grade students who participate in the program during their remaining three years of high school. ITA-TTI Lac du Flambeau students commit to attend the program for several weekend cohort meetings and to complete online coursework throughout the academic year. During the summer, ITA-TTI Lac du Flambeau (10th and 11th graders) attend a two-week commuter camp session. ITA-TTI Lac du Flambeau rising 12th-grade students complete at least 60-hours of a paid internship and participate in a one-week summer residential/overnight camp session on UW-Madison's campus. The technology and college preparation coursework is enhanced by leadership experiences such as a study tour of Silicon Valley technology companies, student council, guest lecturers, resume and cover letter writing workshops, community service outreach, and more. ITA also provides individual attention to students through counseling, mentoring, and tutoring. Students receive a computer with software as well as access to UW-Madison resources. Students who matriculate at UW-Madison become PEOPLE scholars and receive a full-tuition scholarship. The program is provided at no cost to participants.
Information Technology Academy Tribal Technology Institute Lac du Flambeau
In alignment with the UW-Madison’s 2014 Diversity Framework, the Information Technology Academy (ITA) provides services to diverse students with the ultimate goal of increasing their matriculation rates at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Through its triple focus on technological literacy, academic preparation, and leadership development, ITA prepares promising students for learning and leadership in the 21st century digital age. ITA serves three communities: Information Technology Academy Madison (ITA Madison), Information Technology Academy Tribal Technology Institute Lac du Flambeau (ITA-TTI Lac du Flambeau), and Information Technology Academy Tribal Technology Institute Oneida (ITA-TTI Oneida). Each year, ITA-TTI Lac du Flambeau recruits 15 9th grade students who participate in the program during their remaining three years of high school. ITA-TTI Lac du Flambeau students commit to attend the program for several weekend cohort meetings and to complete online coursework throughout the academic year. During the summer, ITA-TTI Lac du Flambeau (10th and 11th graders) attend a two-week commuter camp session. ITA-TTI Lac du Flambeau rising 12th-grade students complete at least 60-hours of a paid internship and participate in a one-week summer residential/overnight camp session on UW-Madison's campus. The technology and college preparation coursework is enhanced by leadership experiences such as a study tour of Silicon Valley technology companies, student council, guest lecturers, resume and cover letter writing workshops, community service outreach, and more. ITA also provides individual attention to students through counseling, mentoring, and tutoring. Students receive a computer with software as well as access to UW-Madison resources. Students who matriculate at UW-Madison become PEOPLE scholars and receive a full-tuition scholarship. The program is provided at no cost to participants.
Information Technology Academy Tribal Technology Institute Oneida
In alignment with the UW-Madison’s 2014 Diversity Framework, the Information Technology Academy (ITA) provides services to diverse students with the ultimate goal of increasing their matriculation rates at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). Through its triple focus on technological literacy, academic preparation, and leadership development, ITA prepares promising students for learning and leadership in the 21st century digital age. ITA serves three communities: Information Technology Academy Madison (ITA Madison), Information Technology Academy Tribal Technology Institute Lac du Flambeau (ITA-TTI Lac du Flambeau), and Information Technology Academy Tribal Technology Institute Oneida (ITA-TTI Oneida). Each year, ITA-TTI Oneida recruits 15 9th grade students who participate in the program during their remaining three years of high school. ITA-TTI Oneida students commit to attend the program for several weekend cohort meetings and to complete online coursework throughout the academic year. During the summer, ITA-TTI Oneida (10th and 11th graders) attend a two-week commuter camp session. ITA-TTI Oneida rising 12th-grade students complete at least 60-hours of a paid internship and participate in a one-week summer residential/overnight camp session on UW-Madison's campus. The technology and college preparation coursework is enhanced by leadership experiences such as a study tour of Silicon Valley technology companies, student council, guest lecturers, resume and cover letter writing workshops, community service outreach, and more. ITA also provides individual attention to students through counseling, mentoring, and tutoring. Students receive a computer with software as well as access to UW-Madison resources. Students who matriculate at UW-Madison become PEOPLE scholars and receive a full-tuition scholarship. The program is provided at no cost to participants.
Intersectionality 101
Intersectionality 201: POC Coalition Building
Isaiah Rashad
live music show
Isaiah Rashad
Israeli Film Festival
film screenings
Iverson Bell Regional Diversity Summit
Jennicet Guiterz "Immigration and Trans Rights" lecture
lecture
Just Bust! Open Mic
Just Bust! is Madison’s longest running all-ages open mic. It features community performances, First Wave mini spotlight performances and First Wave alumni special guest features. It is free and open to the public.
JVN Project- Saba
JVN Project- Saba
Kimbap cooking class with KASA (Korean American Student Association
Latino Youth Summit
A pipeline program that works directly with MMSD Verona School Districts and Centro Hispano Community Center to bring Latinx students in 7/8 grade to campus for a two day summit
Latinx Ball
Latinx/Chicanx Social
Leaders in Engineering Excellence and Diversity
The Leaders in Engineering Excellence and Diversity (LEED) Scholars Program is a competitive scholarship program, designed to attract academically talented women and students from groups historically underrepresented in the field of engineering.
Leadership in the New Economy Event
Opportunity for DDEEA students to network with one another and local and national corporations.
Leadership in the New Economy Event
Opportunity for DDEEA students to network with one another and local and national corporations.
Leadership Institute
The Leadership Institute is a unique opportunity for honing your personal leadership capacities to support the University’s strategic priorities and diversity goals by participating fully as a leader within your work or educational context. It is a nine month long initiative where participants engage weekly in a sustained dialogue within a learning community. The community setting is safe and respectful, yet challenging. Through facilitated small and large group dialogues, reflective writing, readings, DVDs, activities and exercises, participants develop their leadership capacities to effectively interact with members of our community across multiple social identities (Gender, Class, Race/Ethnicity, Ability, Age, Sexual Orientation, etc.), and to build open, dynamic, and respectful working and learning environments for all.
Leadership Institute
The Leadership Institute is a unique opportunity for honing your personal leadership capacities to support the University’s strategic priorities and diversity goals by participating fully as a leader within your work or educational context. It is a nine month long initiative where participants engage weekly in a sustained dialogue within a learning community. The community setting is safe and respectful, yet challenging. Through facilitated small and large group dialogues, reflective writing, readings, DVDs, activities and exercises, participants develop their leadership capacities to effectively interact with members of our community across multiple social identities (Gender, Class, Race/Ethnicity, Ability, Age, Sexual Orientation, etc.), and to build open, dynamic, and respectful working and learning environments for all.
Leadership Institute Lunch & Learn
Learning Communities for Institutional Change & Excellence
LCICE is a unit in the Division of Diversity, Equity and Educational Achievement (DDEEA) that offers academic-year and semester-long Learning Communities (LCs) to help build institutional capacity to implement our strategic diversity initiatives and develop our abilities to engage effectively in a globally interconnected workforce and world. The success of this university in its mission as a world-class teaching, research, and public service institution depends on nurturing a diverse body of students, faculty and staff to foster innovation and excellence.
Learning Communities for Institutional Change & Excellence
LCICE is a unit in the Division of Diversity, Equity and Educational Achievement (DDEEA) that offers academic-year and semester-long Learning Communities (LCs) to help build institutional capacity to implement our strategic diversity initiatives and develop our abilities to engage effectively in a globally interconnected workforce and world. The success of this university in its mission as a world-class teaching, research, and public service institution depends on nurturing a diverse body of students, faculty and staff to foster innovation and excellence.
Learning Communities for Institutional Change & Excellence
LCICE is a unit in the Division of Diversity, Equity and Educational Achievement (DDEEA) that offers academic-year and semester-long Learning Communities (LCs) to help build institutional capacity to implement our strategic diversity initiatives and develop our abilities to engage effectively in a globally interconnected workforce and world. The success of this university in its mission as a world-class teaching, research, and public service institution depends on nurturing a diverse body of students, faculty and staff to foster innovation and excellence.
Let's Talk: Invitation to Dialogue about Diversity
In this interactive session, Prof. Steve Quintana of Counseling Psychology briefly reviewed the principles of dialogue and how they can be used to engage meaningfully with others who have different perspectives, which is an important skill to use in and beyond graduate school. Graduate students learned how dialogues can be used to promote understanding across difference and lead to a more positive community and climate, and experience the dialogue process under Prof. Quintana’s guidance.
LGBTQ Rainbow Graduation
LGBTQ Volunteer Program
The Campus Center offers volunteer opportunities for UW-Madison students. Volunteers gain professional experience, make friends, and test out whether this kind of work is their passion! Volunteers do things like answer phone calls, manage office resources, work on special projects, and keep the space vibe open and friendly! You can expect to gain communication and interpersonal skills, develop your problem-solving capabilities, and work with a variety of people from many backgrounds.
LGBTQ Welcome Ice Cream Social and Resource Fair
Resource fair for LGBTQ+ students to connect with relevant campus resources and build community on the first day of school.
LGBTQ+ Community and Advocacy Group
This group is composed of faculty, staff and students who identify as LBGTQ+ and active allies; focused on creating community and fostering an environment of support for persons within veterinary medicine
LGBTQ+ Community and Advocacy Group
This group is composed of faculty, staff and students who identify as LBGTQ+ and active allies; focused on creating community and fostering an environment of support for persons within veterinary medicine
Line Breaks Festival
The University of Wisconsin-Madison Office of Multicultural Arts Initiatives' (OMAI) 10th Annual Line Breaks Festival brings the top new aesthetics in contemporary performance art to the UW-Madison campus and surrounding community, paired with our annual student performances by First Wave. To realize this, OMAI makes Line Breaks activities free and open to the public in easily accessible spaces.
Lit Fest 2017: An Evening with Roxanne Gay
Local hip hop festival
LSAC Prelaw Undergraduate Scholars Program at University of Wisconsin Law School
The PLUS Program endeavors to help students explore legal education and careers in law and to help them succeed in applying to, enrolling in, and graduating from law school. Targeted to students who have completed their freshman or sophomore years at four-year colleges and universities, technical colleges and community colleges, the program focuses on attracting promising students from groups historically underrepresented in the legal profession and from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds, as well as students facing other significant barriers to entering the legal profession. Though initially funded with a grant from AccessLex in 2015 (billed as the James E. Jones Jr Pre-Law Scholars Program), the program continues on under Law School Admission Council (LSAC) renewable funding through 2019.
LSAC Prelaw Undergraduate Scholars Program at University of Wisconsin Law School
The PLUS Program endeavors to help students explore legal education and careers in law and to help them succeed in applying to, enrolling in, and graduating from law school. Targeted to students who have completed their freshman or sophomore years at four-year colleges and universities, technical colleges and community colleges, the program focuses on attracting promising students from groups historically underrepresented in the legal profession and from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds, as well as students facing other significant barriers to entering the legal profession. Though initially funded with a grant from AccessLex in 2015 (billed as the James E. Jones Jr Pre-Law Scholars Program), the program continues on under Law School Admission Council (LSAC) renewable funding through 2019.
LSAC Prelaw Undergraduate Scholars Program at University of Wisconsin Law School
The PLUS Program endeavors to help students explore legal education and careers in law and to help them succeed in applying to, enrolling in, and graduating from law school. Targeted to students who have completed their freshman or sophomore years at four-year colleges and universities, technical colleges and community colleges, the program focuses on attracting promising students from groups historically underrepresented in the legal profession and from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds, as well as students facing other significant barriers to entering the legal profession. Though initially funded with a grant from AccessLex in 2015 (billed as the James E. Jones Jr Pre-Law Scholars Program), the program continues on under Law School Admission Council (LSAC) renewable funding through 2019.
Marquee International Film Festival
Film Festival
Mass Incarceration and Wisconsin Sentencing Policy - Michael O'Hear, Ceceilia Klingele, Talib
Melanin Fest: Welcome Back BBQ
Mental Health Abroad Student Identity Page
IAP has been working in collaboration with other units to create identity pages for students to better prepare them for their time abroad.
Mentoring, Mingling, and Mama's Treats
In partnership with 100 Black Men Madison Chapter, event features keynote speakers from community and soul food dinner and desserts. Purpose is to provide networking opportunities and build community both on and off campus.
MERIT First Nations Integration Plan
MERIT is working with American Indian Curriculum Services Coordinator and Assistant Dean of Diversity for the School of Education to create a First Nations Integration plan. We began this process with initial conversation in Fall 2017. We are currently in an educational phase of the initiative. In order create an effective First Nations Integration plan, we have engaged in education initiatives. In Spring 2018, the MERIT staff went on First Nations campus tour and also had a guest Emmon Rogers present on First Nations Integration in New Zealand. On July 17, MERIT and the General Library System will host a training by David O'Connor who is the American Indian Studies Coordinator for the Department of Instruction. We currently have 40 participants from the School of Education, the General Library System, and the other departments registered to attend. We are also looking at doing outreach to specific departments in the fall.
Middle Eastern/Arab Social
Mini Lessons on Language and Culture
MSC Social Justice Speaker Series Presents: Bree Newsome
Bree Newsome is the community organizer and activist who removed the Confederate flag from the South Carolina State House. The iconic picture of her on the pole, flag in hand, has become a touchstone of empowerment for disenfranchised people around the world. A graduate of NYU's Tisch School of the Arts, Bree is also an award-winning filmmaker, writer, composer, and singer who believes in art activism. Currently, she works as a western field organizer for IgniteNC, a project of the Southern Vision Alliance and she is a founding member of Tribe, a grassroots organizing collective dedicated to empowering underserved communities in Charlotte, NC.
Multicultural Affairs Alumni Homecoming Reception
A reception is held to provide an informal setting for current students and alumni to network.
Multicultural Affairs Alumni Homecoming Reception
A reception is held to provide an informal setting for current students and alumni to network.
Multicultural Affairs Back To School Reception
Multicultural Affairs hosts a reception to kick off a new academic year for current students and welcome incoming students to campus.
Multicultural Affairs Back To School Reception
Multicultural Affairs hosts a reception to kick off a new academic year for current students and welcome incoming students to campus.
Multicultural Affairs Graduation Celebraton
The Office of Multicultural Affairs hosts a ceremony and reception for graduating medical students. Students of color and students who are members of the Medical Students for Minority Concerns are invited to participate. Their families are invited to attend, as well as all current students, faculty and staff. An alum of SMPH is brought in to give a keynote address. Then the graduates are individually presented with a small gift and given an opportunity to speak to the attendees, usually giving inspiration to the underclassmen and thanking those who have helped them on their medical school journey. Additionally, the students present a plaque to a faculty or staff member as a special recognition for their work with students. This is immediately followed by a reception.
Multicultural Affairs Graduation Celebraton
The Office of Multicultural Affairs hosts a ceremony and reception for graduating medical students. Students of color and students who are members of the Medical Students for Minority Concerns are invited to participate. Their families are invited to attend, as well as all current students, faculty and staff. An alum of SMPH is brought in to give a keynote address. Then the graduates are individually presented with a small gift and given an opportunity to speak to the attendees, usually giving inspiration to the underclassmen and thanking those who have helped them on their medical school journey. Additionally, the students present a plaque to a faculty or staff member as a special recognition for their work with students. This is immediately followed by a reception.
Multicultural Community Social
Multicultural Homecoming Diversity Celebration
In partnership with WFAA. Can consist of a dinner, gamewatch, celebration, or alumni lunch panel.
Multicultural Homecoming Diversity Celebration
In partnership with WFAA. Can consist of a dinner, gamewatch, celebration, or alumni lunch panel.
Multicultural Leadership Awards
Multicultural Orientation and Reception
Multicultural Orientation and Reception
Multiracial Social
National Conferences Outreach
As part of the WIDA mission, staff members regularly attend, present, and exhibit at prominent national conferences around the country. Our engagement supports language development for multilingual language learners who often come from very diverse backgrounds. So far this year, WIDA has been active with the following events: National Title I Conference, TESOL International Conference, National Science Teachers Conferences, National Migrant Education Conference, National Council of State Title III Directors, Wisconsin Fulfilling the Promise Early Childhood Conference, LULAC Florida, Minority Student Achievement Network Institute, the National Association of Bilingual Educators Conference, and the National Conference on Student Assessment. Each of these events bring large numbers of diverse educators, administrators, parents, and students into direct contact and conversations with WIDA Staff.
National Diversity Council Women in Leadership Symposium
In parternership with National Diversity Council. Primarily female UW-Madison staff members and female undergrad and grad students attend this panel discussion with local female leaders, hear presentations, and participate in Q&A.
National Diversity Council Women in Leadership Symposium
In parternership with National Diversity Council. Primarily female UW-Madison staff members and female undergrad and grad students attend this panel discussion with local female leaders, hear presentations, and participate in Q&A.
National Diversity Council Women in Leadership Symposium
In parternership with National Diversity Council. Primarily female UW-Madison staff members and female undergrad and grad students attend this panel discussion with local female leaders, hear presentations, and participate in Q&A.
Native American Student Pathways to Success
Cultural Competency lunch and learn to be supportive allies for Native American Students
Native/Indigenous Social
Night at the Biocommons
This event was hosted to bring academic support resources, student organizations to steenbok library in the bio commons area. Invited campus resources to the biocommons like chemistry learning center, Physics, engineering, libraries, guts, CALS, Housing, PLA, student organizations and other campus resources to support DDEEA students and students who attend the biocommons to learn tips and tricks for success as an undergrad.
Office of Multicultural Affairs
The Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA) takes leadership for the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health's student diversity outreach initiatives, including its recruitment and enrollment activities. The OMA provides guidance to a number of campus-community educational linkages, summer research efforts, and initiatives targeted towards expanding diverse undergraduate participation in the health professions. Furthermore, pre-medical advising and interaction with merit-based and enrichment programs plus pre-health organizations have been critical in the identification and mentoring of promising medical school applicants.
Origins of Morality - Yasir Qahdi and Russ Shaefer-Landau
Outstanding Women of Color Reception
Primarily attended by faculty, staff and honorees' families. Purpose is to formally recognize women who meet criteria.
Outstanding Women of Color Reception
Primarily attended by faculty, staff and honorees' families. Purpose is to formally recognize women who meet criteria.
Outstanding Women of Color Reception
Primarily attended by faculty, staff and honorees' families. Purpose is to formally recognize women who meet criteria.
P.O.W.E.R. Collective
People.Of.Wisdom.Etermally. Revolutionizing (P.O.W.E.R.) Collective serves as a collected space at UW-Madison - housed in the School of Human Ecology Civil Society and Community Research department - to support research, political and community action programs. and professional development for and by communities of color.
Passing the Mic Festival
The 11th Annual Passing the Mic Festival celebrates the transformational potential of hip hop arts in the Madison community and on the UW-Madison campus. It involves First Wave Scholars, teen artists from across the UW and internationally renowned performing artists. In 2015, OMAI welcomed a world class team of performers including Cuba's Telmary Diaz, Grammy award winner J. Ivy, Native Rapper Frank Walk and Baba Israel. The title was "Indigenous Traditions, Multilingual Voices".
PEOPLE College Mentor Program
The PEOPLE Mentorship Program is designed to help First-Year PEOPLE Scholars transition to life at UW – Madison. Participants (Peer Mentees) will be matched with a Peer Mentor who is a current PEOPLE Scholar. Mentors can assist Mentees with: course selection, campus involvement (i.e., Registered Student Organizations, campus social events, etc.), academic advice (i.e., courses to avoid taking together, etc.), personal advice and identifying campus resources for various reasons.
PEOPLE College Mentor Program
The PEOPLE Mentorship Program is designed to help First-Year PEOPLE Scholars transition to life at UW – Madison. Participants (Peer Mentees) will be matched with a Peer Mentor who is a current PEOPLE Scholar. Mentors can assist Mentees with: course selection, campus involvement (i.e., Registered Student Organizations, campus social events, etc.), academic advice (i.e., courses to avoid taking together, etc.), personal advice and identifying campus resources for various reasons.
PEOPLE College Program
The PEOPLE College Program is a unit within the Pre-college Enrichment Opportunity Program for Learning Excellence (PEOPLE). The College Scholar team consists of the Assistant Director, two College Advisors and two Teaching Assistants. The College Program works with PEOPLE students who have successfully completed the Pre-college component of PEOPLE and have been admitted to UW-Madison. Once they matriculate to UW-Madison, the students receive a four-year tuition only scholarship and are referred to as College Scholars or PEOPLE Scholars. The College Advisors provide holistic and academic advising, referral services, student leadership and post-graduation development for the College Scholars. They also provide support for Transfer students. The Teaching Assistants teach two courses throughout the academic year; the First Year Experience course (Fall term) and Careers/Major Course (Spring term), and also provide advising support for the students in their courses.
PEOPLE College Program
The PEOPLE College Program is a unit within the Pre-college Enrichment Opportunity Program for Learning Excellence (PEOPLE). The College Scholar team consists of the Assistant Director, two College Advisors and two Teaching Assistants. The College Program works with PEOPLE students who have successfully completed the Pre-college component of PEOPLE and have been admitted to UW-Madison. Once they matriculate to UW-Madison, the students receive a four-year tuition only scholarship and are referred to as College Scholars or PEOPLE Scholars. The College Advisors provide holistic and academic advising, referral services, student leadership and post-graduation development for the College Scholars. They also provide support for Transfer students. The Teaching Assistants teach two courses throughout the academic year; the First Year Experience course (Fall term) and Careers/Major Course (Spring term), and also provide advising support for the students in their courses.
PEOPLE College Retreat
Annual retreat for PEOPLE College Scholars. This year's retreat focused on Building Your Best Self. Workshops hosted by staff, alumni and campus partners focused on various ways students could be their best self. Topics included: wellness, professional development, graduate school and social justice.
PEOPLE College Retreat
Annual retreat for PEOPLE College Scholars. This year's retreat focused on Building Your Best Self. Workshops hosted by staff, alumni and campus partners focused on various ways students could be their best self. Topics included: wellness, professional development, graduate school and social justice.
PEOPLE College Retreat
Annual retreat for PEOPLE College Scholars. This year's retreat focused on Building Your Best Self. Workshops hosted by staff, alumni and campus partners focused on various ways students could be their best self. Topics included: wellness, professional development, graduate school and social justice.
PEOPLE College Senior Sendoff
Celebration of PEOPLE graduates each semester.
PEOPLE College Senior Sendoff
Celebration of PEOPLE graduates each semester.
PEOPLE College Senior Sendoff
Celebration of PEOPLE graduates each semester.
PEOPLE Fall Kick-Off
Annual kick-off event for all PEOPLE College Scholars. PEOPLE College staff share updates & announcements for the upcoming academic year as well as review the Scholarship Agreement. Campus partners are invited to share/talk about their services and resources for students. Large and small group activities are conducted to build community among the students.
PEOPLE Fall Kick-Off
Annual kick-off event for all PEOPLE College Scholars. PEOPLE College staff share updates & announcements for the upcoming academic year as well as review the Scholarship Agreement. Campus partners are invited to share/talk about their services and resources for students. Large and small group activities are conducted to build community among the students.
PEOPLE Fall Kick-Off
Annual kick-off event for all PEOPLE College Scholars. PEOPLE College staff share updates & announcements for the upcoming academic year as well as review the Scholarship Agreement. Campus partners are invited to share/talk about their services and resources for students. Large and small group activities are conducted to build community among the students.
PEOPLE High School
Teach high school students in the PEOPLE program with a strong interest in veterinary medicine about the profession.
PEOPLE Veterinary Expedition
Teach middle school students with an interest in science and/or animals about careers in veterinary medicine through speakers, hands-on activities and field trips
Pharmacy Summer Program
The Pharmacy Summer Program (PSP) is a four-day summer program for rising high school juniors and seniors interested in learning more about pharmacy careers and the UW-Madison Doctor of Pharmacy Program. The Pharmacy Summer Program targets rising high school juniors and seniors from traditionally underrepresented groups in the health science fields. Students who identify as African-American/Black, Native American/American Indian, Latino/a, Laotian, Vietnamese, Hmong, Cambodian are especially encouraged to apply.
Physics Learning Center
The Physics Learning Center (PLC) provides a supportive learning community for students studying introductory physics and opportunities to find study partners. Students work together in small-group learning team sessions to practice problem solving and discuss key concepts. Study groups meet twice each week and are led by trained undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors and staff. We also offer access to extra study materials and exam review sessions. The PLC primarily works with students in Physics 103,104, 207 and 208. We also ran a small program during the Fall semester for students taking the Physics in the Arts course, most of whom were from First Wave and were taking this course as part of their First Year Interest Group courses. The Physics Learning Center works with campus partner programs (such as PEOPLE, CeO, CAE, First Wave, POSSE, Chancellor's/PK) to reach out to students from these groups and who may be feeling more isolated in their large introductory physics courses. Participants in our program include returning adults, students from historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, student in the first generation of their family to attend college, students from families in lower income circumstances, transfer students, veterans, students from small rural schools, and students with disabilities. We also work with students with higher risk for having academic difficulty in the course due to factors such as academic probation, previous D,F, or drop in physics, weak math preparation, or no high school physics. The PLC also provides teaching and leadership experience and a supportive community for our undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors. Many of our tutors were former Physics Learning Center participants, including students in PEOPLE, First Wave, and the Center for Academic Excellence. Tutors attend on-going training sessions twice per week throughout the semester that covers topics including techniques for promoting active learning, creating a supportive and inclusive learning environment, and tutoring specific course content.
Physics Learning Center
The Physics Learning Center (PLC) provides a supportive learning community for students studying introductory physics and opportunities to find study partners. Students work together in small-group learning team sessions to practice problem solving and discuss key concepts. Study groups meet twice each week and are led by trained undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors and staff. We also offer access to extra study materials and exam review sessions. The PLC primarily works with students in Physics 103,104, 207 and 208. We also ran a small program during the Fall semester for students taking the Physics in the Arts course, most of whom were from First Wave and were taking this course as part of their First Year Interest Group courses. The Physics Learning Center works with campus partner programs (such as PEOPLE, CeO, CAE, First Wave, POSSE, Chancellor's/PK) to reach out to students from these groups and who may be feeling more isolated in their large introductory physics courses. Participants in our program include returning adults, students from historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, student in the first generation of their family to attend college, students from families in lower income circumstances, transfer students, veterans, students from small rural schools, and students with disabilities. We also work with students with higher risk for having academic difficulty in the course due to factors such as academic probation, previous D,F, or drop in physics, weak math preparation, or no high school physics. The PLC also provides teaching and leadership experience and a supportive community for our undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors. Many of our tutors were former Physics Learning Center participants, including students in PEOPLE, First Wave, and the Center for Academic Excellence. Tutors attend on-going training sessions twice per week throughout the semester that covers topics including techniques for promoting active learning, creating a supportive and inclusive learning environment, and tutoring specific course content.
Physics Learning Center
The Physics Learning Center (PLC) provides a supportive learning community for students studying introductory physics and opportunities to find study partners. Students work together in small-group learning team sessions to practice problem solving and discuss key concepts. Study groups meet twice each week and are led by trained undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors and staff. We also offer access to extra study materials and exam review sessions. The PLC primarily works with students in Physics 103,104, 207 and 208. We also ran a small program during the Fall semester for students taking the Physics in the Arts course, most of whom were from First Wave and were taking this course as part of their First Year Interest Group courses. The Physics Learning Center works with campus partner programs (such as PEOPLE, CeO, CAE, First Wave, POSSE, Chancellor's/PK) to reach out to students from these groups and who may be feeling more isolated in their large introductory physics courses. Participants in our program include returning adults, students from historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups, student in the first generation of their family to attend college, students from families in lower income circumstances, transfer students, veterans, students from small rural schools, and students with disabilities. We also work with students with higher risk for having academic difficulty in the course due to factors such as academic probation, previous D,F, or drop in physics, weak math preparation, or no high school physics. The PLC also provides teaching and leadership experience and a supportive community for our undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors. Many of our tutors were former Physics Learning Center participants, including students in PEOPLE, First Wave, and the Center for Academic Excellence. Tutors attend on-going training sessions twice per week throughout the semester that covers topics including techniques for promoting active learning, creating a supportive and inclusive learning environment, and tutoring specific course content. The PLC works with about 10-15% of students in the supported courses (103, 104, 207, 208), as well as others who access our materials and participate in review sessions. Additionally, we work with about 15-20 undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors each semester. The number of student participants listed below represents the approximate number of students who participated in PLC learning teams each semester.
Pi Day
STEM students come together to celebrate Pi Day.
Pieces of the Puzzle: Intersectionality on Campus
Poetry in Context with Dr. Eve Ewing
Posse Big Meeting
TBD
Posse Plus Retreat
Posse Plus Retreat serves as a community-building event that aims to make students feel comfortable and welcome in the spaces that they inhabit.
Posse Program
The Posse Foundation was founded in 1989 when a student said, "I wouldn't have dropped out of college if I had my posse with me." Since then, the Posse Foundation has identified, recruited and trained 8,480 public high school students with extraordinary academic and leadership potential to become Posse Scholars. Posse's 56 partner colleges and universities have awarded those Scholars over $1 billion in four-year, full-tuition merit leadership scholarships. In 2002, UW-Madison became the first major public institution to join the Posse Foundation partnership. Their first posse, from Chicago, began classes at UW-Madison in the fall semester that year. A “posse” is a small, diverse group of talented students, selected and trained, to serve as a catalyst for increased individual and community development.
Posse Program
The Posse Foundation was founded in 1989 when a student said, "I wouldn't have dropped out of college if I had my posse with me." Since then, the Posse Foundation has identified, recruited and trained 8,480 public high school students with extraordinary academic and leadership potential to become Posse Scholars. Posse's 56 partner colleges and universities have awarded those Scholars over $1 billion in four-year, full-tuition merit leadership scholarships. In 2002, UW-Madison became the first major public institution to join the Posse Foundation partnership. Their first posse, from Chicago, began classes at UW-Madison in the fall semester that year. A “posse” is a small, diverse group of talented students, selected and trained, to serve as a catalyst for increased individual and community development.
Posse Program
The Posse Foundation was founded in 1989 when a student said, "I wouldn't have dropped out of college if I had my posse with me." Since then, the Posse Foundation has identified, recruited and trained 8,480 public high school students with extraordinary academic and leadership potential to become Posse Scholars. Posse's 56 partner colleges and universities have awarded those Scholars over $1 billion in four-year, full-tuition merit leadership scholarships. In 2002, UW-Madison became the first major public institution to join the Posse Foundation partnership. Their first posse, from Chicago, began classes at UW-Madison in the fall semester that year. A “posse” is a small, diverse group of talented students, selected and trained, to serve as a catalyst for increased individual and community development.
Posse Study Jam
Study Jam aims to provide scholars a place to prepare for final exams, projects and papers. A variety of food is provided at three intervals to give students an energy boost.
Postcards Home
Postcards Home with ISS
Powers-Knapp Big Sibling/Little Sibling Orientation
Powers-Knapp scholars are matched with incoming PK freshmen as part of an on-going mentoring relationship.
Powers-Knapp Scholarship Programs
The Powers-Knapp Scholarship Program was established in 1989 in response to the growing number of academically promising ethnic minority and underrepresented students who were applying to UW-Madison. It was contended that with nurturing and support, promising students could realize their potential to excel both within and outside the classroom experience. A high touch approach is used in providing support to and setting high expectations of Powers-Knapp Scholars so that they will strive for academic excellence, work intentionally to develop their leadership potential, and engage in individual and collective stewardship activities both on and outside the campus community.
Powers-Knapp Scholarship Programs
The Powers-Knapp Scholarship Program was established in 1989 in response to the growing number of academically promising ethnic minority and underrepresented students who were applying to UW-Madison. It was contended that with nurturing and support, promising students could realize their potential to excel both within and outside the classroom experience. A high touch approach is used in providing support to and setting high expectations of Powers-Knapp Scholars so that they will strive for academic excellence, work intentionally to develop their leadership potential, and engage in individual and collective stewardship activities both on and outside the campus community.
Powers-Knapp Scholarship Programs
The Powers-Knapp Scholarship Program was established in 1989 in response to the growing number of academically promising ethnic minority and underrepresented students who were applying to UW-Madison. It was contended that with nurturing and support, promising students could realize their potential to excel both within and outside the classroom experience. A high touch approach is used in providing support to and setting high expectations of Powers-Knapp Scholars so that they will strive for academic excellence, work intentionally to develop their leadership potential, and engage in individual and collective stewardship activities both on and outside the campus community.
Practicing Self Care and Decentering Whiteness
Precollege Council
The Precollege Council, founded in 1991 originally housed in the Division of Continuing Studies, provides an informal forum for discussion and networking through regularly scheduled monthly meetings and regular correspondence. Membership is open to all precollege directors, staff and their designees. University of Wisconsin-Madison currently has 148 Precollege Programs identified by the Council. These programs provide academic and enrichment experiences creating a continuum of educational support that increase access to and success in post-secondary education. Programs provide hands-on, interactive, experiential learning opportunities that are research-based and not found in a typical classroom with the purpose to explore academic areas, career options, and college readiness.
Precollege Enrichment Opportunity Program for Learning Excellence
PEOPLE is where the Wisconsin Idea Happens! We prepare Wisconsin students to succeed in the UW-System with an emphasis on UW-Madison. Our students master academic knowledge, build cognitive strategies, learn to self-manage, and discover college life through experiential learning. To date over 1000 students have enrolled in UW-Madison on the PEOPLE tuition scholarship.
Precollege Enrichment Opportunity Program for Learning Excellence
PEOPLE is where the Wisconsin Idea Happens! We prepare Wisconsin students to succeed in the UW-System with an emphasis on UW-Madison. Our students master academic knowledge, build cognitive strategies, learn to self-manage, and discover college life through experiential learning. To date over 1000 students have enrolled in UW-Madison on the PEOPLE tuition scholarship.
Precollege Enrichment Opportunity Program for Learning Excellence
PEOPLE is where the Wisconsin Idea Happens! We prepare Wisconsin students to succeed in the UW-System with an emphasis on UW-Madison. Our students master academic knowledge, build cognitive strategies, learn to self-manage, and discover college life through experiential learning. To date over 1000 students have enrolled in UW-Madison on the PEOPLE tuition scholarship.
Pre-Health Careers Day
A full day event for undergraduates interested in pursuing a Health Career. Participants attend sessions on Admissions requirements, becoming a competitive applicant, and financial aid, as well as panel discussions from current health professions students and tours of the facilities.
Professional Development Series
Professional Reflections
Program Evaluations
We have included information in our returned student evaluations to gather information on how identity is impacting students abroad.
Pushkin Summer Institute at UW-Madison
The Pushkin Summer Institute is an empowering and transformative educational experience for American high school students from underprivileged or minority backgrounds. Underlying the program is a multi-pronged strategy that combines the latest knowledge about best practices in foreign language acquisition with an integrated subject curriculum focused around Alexander Pushkin, Russia’s national poet (“Russia’s Shakespeare”), whose African heritage was instrumental in his sense of identity and in crucial aspects of his life and works. The example of Pushkin has never been used this way with an American student audience, and we believe his life story, his extraordinary ancestry, his supreme ability to turn the adverse circumstances dealt to him by life into creative behavior and a legacy that has touched millions, can be harnessed so as to inspire young people who may have their own challenging circumstances to overcome.
Pussy Riot in Conversation
QTPOC Social
Recognizing and Reducing Implicit Bias
Building cultural competence is critically important for graduate students and professionals across all disciplines. This interactive talk introduces graduate students to the concepts of implicit or unconscious biases and assumptions about diverse groups of people by treating the application of such biases as a habit of mind. Students will learn how to uncover their own biases, discover the underlying concepts and language used in the psychological and social psychological literature to describe such processes, and learn evidence-based strategies for reducing the application of these biases as they cultivate relationships with people from different backgrounds, experiences, and cultures.
Renk Learning Center
A new area that includes an active learning area for team-based problem-solving and case studies, an expanded Clinical Skills Training Center for practicing core veterinary medical skills, an additional counseling office and meditation room , dedicated study and testing accommodation spaces, and much more.
Renk Learning Center
A new area that includes an active learning area for team-based problem-solving and case studies, an expanded Clinical Skills Training Center for practicing core veterinary medical skills, an additional counseling office and meditation room , dedicated study and testing accommodation spaces, and much more.
Research Mentor Training
Mentor training can make the difference between a mutually beneficial and productive mentoring relationship and one that is draining for the mentor and discouraging for the mentee. Research Mentor Training creates learning communities that explore multiple culturally aware strategies for effective mentoring with case studies, discussions, and readings. Participants will craft a statement of mentoring philosophy and discuss relevant issues as they come up. Ten-week seminars and custom workshops are available for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, staff, and faculty.
Rooted: Community for QTPOC students
A biweekly discussion group and bread-breaking for LGBTQ+ students of color.
Runways of the World
Runways of the World Fashion Show
School of Education Go Big Read
Series of events integrating the theme of the 2016-2017 Go Big Read of "Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City" by Matthew Desmond with School of Education research areas. The fall semester events are hosted prior to the author's visit to UW-Madison on Tuesday, November 1, 2016. The series highlights research areas of faculty and serves as professional development for faculty, staff and students at UW-Madison. The first event featured the Wisconsin HOPE Lab on Thursday, September 22, 2016, discussing "Poverty in America’s Colleges: Housing & Food Insecurity Among Undergraduates." College enrollment is on the rise and so are college prices. Real incomes for most American families have been flat or falling and financial aid has not kept pace with the need. As a result there are college students going hungry or homeless while pursing their educational goals. Drawing on multiple studies, researchers from the Wisconsin HOPE Lab will discuss the prevalence of housing and food insecurity among college students, share students’ perspectives on the topic, and propose policy solutions. Featuring: Katharine Broton, PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology; Emily Brunjes Colo, Data Manager/Analyst, Wisconsin HOPE Lab; Anthony Hernandez, Graduate Student, Dept. of Educational Policy Studies; and, Minhtuyen Mai, Research Specialist, Wisconsin HOPE Lab. The second event featured Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis (ELPA) Prof. Miller, whose research areas include "Educational opportunity for homeless students" and "Brokering opportunity for homeless students." The Hidden Opportunity Leaders Amid the Crisis of Eviction and Homelessness, Wednesday, October 26, 2016. As communities face daunting challenges associated with poverty, eviction, and homelessness, a range of “hidden leaders” emerge to support children and families. Who are these leaders and what makes them effective? Professor Miller draws parallels between his research on homelessness and key themes in Evicted to discuss ways opportunity unfolds in neighborhoods and communities.
School of Education Graduate Assistant Orientation
The SOE Graduate Assistant Orientation is a one-day annual training for new graduate assistants hired in the School of Education. The orientation is designed to provide graduate students with strategies for success and training sessions related to their various roles at teaching assistants, project assistants, and research assistants. It provides new graduate assistants with information regarding the resources available to them. The program provides opportunities for community building for new and continuing students. The annual event is centered on equity, multiculturalism, and diversity, with faculty keynotes addressing areas of equity and diversity that graduate students can address and advance in their roles.
School of Education Graduate Assistant Orientation
The SOE Graduate Assistant Orientation is a one-day annual training for new graduate assistants hired in the School of Education. The orientation is designed to provide graduate students with strategies for success and training sessions related to their various roles at teaching assistants, project assistants, and research assistants. It provides new graduate assistants with information regarding the resources available to them. The program provides opportunities for community building for new and continuing students. The annual event is centered on equity, multiculturalism, and diversity, with faculty keynotes addressing areas of equity and diversity that graduate students can address and advance in their roles.
School of Pharmacy Community Spaces
School of Pharmacy Student Community Spaces are spaces for support and discussion that are open to all PharmD, PharmTox and graduate students. These spaces have been created for students to gather in community, safety, and solidarity; to process, share, and de-stress from the various forces in our lives. All students are welcome.
School of Pharmacy Lunch & Learns
The purpose of these sessions is to provide a time and space for members of our community to connect, build community and engage in topics that are deeply impacting our campus, our school, our students and our lives. The hope is that these sessions will begin thoughtful dialogue around issues of diversity, inclusion and social justice for all of us.
School of Pharmacy Professional Development & Engagement Sessions
This required course is the first of five in a 3-year sequence of professional development and engagement seminars that assist students with career exploration and emphasize how their knowledge, skills, abilities, and values further professional development. The goal is to impart to the graduate the knowledge, skills, abilities, behaviors, and attitudes necessary to demonstrate self-awareness, leadership, innovation and entrepreneurship, and professionalism.
School of Pharmacy Student Voice
An online medium where students can submit feedback and/or concerns regarding their experience in the School of Pharmacy. All submissions are reviewed by the Equity, Diversity and Climate committee and recommendations are shared with appropriate departments in the school to address student concerns.
Screening of Netflix' documentary 13th
free screening for staff of 13th along with post-screening discussion
Seeing Color: Race and Faith
Selena Karaoke and Papel Picado
Come sing some Selena and other songs while also making traditional Latinx artwork! Multicultural Student Center, Red Gym. 5:30-7 p.m. Cost: Free.
Sense of Belonging Book Series
DART+ (Director’s All-Reports Team + Deputies) read College Students’ Sense of Belonging: A Key to Educational Success for All Students. The group focused on how to adjust our services to students as well as to our student employees and FTEs to ensure that we are always considering others’ sense of belonging when we institute new policies and procedures.
Sisters in Solidarity Discussion Group
Sponsored by the Multicultural Student Center Multicultural Student Center, Red Gym. 5:30-7 p.m. Cost: Free
Sisters In Solidarity: Womyn of Color Support Group
S.I.S., Sisters in Solidarity, is a support group intended for self-identified womyn of color. We welcome multiple backgrounds whether they identify as Asian, Latina, Black, Native, Middle Eastern, etc. We hope to create a space where womyn of color can fully voice their lived experiences and express their authentic selves with others who share similar stories.
Social Justice 101
Social Justice Change
The WIDA Social Justice Change Team has been collaborating with the YWCA to implement several social justice related changes within the organization. With training, support & resources from the YWCA Madison, the WIDA Social Justice Change Team has been working organizational equity and inclusion. Several task force teams have come out of this effort to implement related tasks to the overall work. The Social Justice Change team has also been collaborating with WIDA leadership and the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, where WIDA is housed, to increase the center's diversity and inclusion.
Social Justice Leadership Retreat
Social Justice Self Care Workshop
Social Justice Speaker: Bilquis Qaadir
Social Justice Speaker: Ja'Mel Ware
Social Justice Speaker: Kimberly Foster
Social Justice Speaker: World Aids Day Panel
Social Justice Workshop: Deconstructing Whiteness
Social Workers Confronting Racial Injustice Conference
Every year the school hosts this conference for 500 students, faculty, staff, and community social workers. It includes a national keynote and 15-20 workshops. Workshops are interactive and emphasize action. We are interested in practitioner-focused, innovative social work practice presentations that appeal to a wide audience. Registration fills up in less than one day. The conference challenges social workers to engage in racial and social justice action. The goals are to: 1. Explore the impact of social policies and social services on racial inequities, including the unintended consequences of these policies and services. 2. Support social workers working toward an increasingly equitable and racially just society. 3. Celebrate the profound social justice actions of our social work community.
SoHE EcoWell Initiative
EcoWell's mission is to create proactive and responsive pathways in the School of Human Ecology for the pursuit and practice of well-being that embraces equity, justice, love, and belonging.
Spring Keynote Speaker: Dion Vargas
Spring Keynote Speaker: Imam Daayiee Abdullah
SQUAD retreat
Leadership development and community restoration retreat for LGBTQ+ students across three UW System campuses.
Steepin it Real
STEM Ambassadors
STEM Ambassadors are a group of Sophomores - Seniors designed to promote community among STEM undergraduates. The meetings focus on strategies for navigation, wellness, and outreach within the STEM community.
STEM Diversity Network
The UW-Madison STEM diversity network is the online destination for resources related to STEM diversity on campus and beyond. This website is funded by a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and the UW-Madison Chancellor’s office to Ahna Skop at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This site is a collaboration between Skop, two undergraduates (Olushola Kemi Olukoga & Kaitlin Morse), one graduate student (Jennifer Gilbert), Don Stanley (Life Sciences Communication), Tom Browne (CALS Academic Dean & Chair of CALS Equity and Diversity) and newly retired, Lilian Tong (WISCIENCE). The main goals of the STEM diversity network are to: Catalyze communication and collaboration among students, faculty and staff on the UW-Madison campus in STEM fields. Provide resources and opportunities that allow undergraduates, graduate students, postdocs, and scientists to succeed in STEM fields. Provide outreach to the public outside of the UW-Madison campus. Create community in STEM on the UW-Madison campus.
STEM Internship Event
The STEM Internship Event is meant to provide students with resources to find, apply for, and gain summer internships, research experience or study abroad opportunities in STEM fields. Participants spend time with student panelists with unique summer experiences and are given enormous resource lists with available internships, research positions and study abroad programs, as well as information on creating effective resumes, CVs, cover letters, personal statements, requesting letters of recommendation, etc.
STEM Professional Series: Exploring Your Summer in STEM
The Exploring Your Summer in STEM event is geared towards helping STEM undergraduates find meaningful summer opportunities, specifically summer research, internships and STEM programs. This event provides resources, a panel, student advice, and tips on next steps to optimizing STEM scholars summer experiences Freshmen - Senior.
STEM Retreat
The STEM Retreat serves as an avenue for first and second year STEM students to explore, navigate, and build community around the STEM fields at UW-Madison with a focus on resources, wellness, and STEM identity.
STEM Retreat
The annual STEM Retreat serves as a way to help first and second year STEM scholars navigate wellness and community in STEM at UW-Madison. Participants receive invaluable information from administrators, professors, faculty and fellow scholars through two unique panels. They are provided with a critical list of campus services and connections with plenty of information on how to make use of them.
Straight Outta Compton
film screening
STUDENT ART SHOW
STUDENT ART SHOW -- open call to all students, diverse mix of submissions, subject & media
STUDENT ART SHOW [open call to all students, diverse mix of submissions, subject & media]
Student S.E.E.D. (Seeking Educational Equity through Diversity)
The aim in Student SEED (CP325) is to create a place where students can share their lived experiences, learn from their peers’ lives and build an inclusive community while engaging in deep critical thinking around issues crucial to our world today. This course is a unique opportunity to meet in a challenging yet respectful environment for facilitated conversations on defining aspects of our identities. Students study the impact of each aspect of identity upon themselves and others with the communities in which they live, learn, and work.
Student S.E.E.D. (Seeking Educational Equity through Diversity)
The aim in Student SEED (CP325) is to create a place where students can share their lived experiences, learn from their peers’ lives and build an inclusive community while engaging in deep critical thinking around issues crucial to our world today. This course is a unique opportunity to meet in a challenging yet respectful environment for facilitated conversations on defining aspects of our identities. Students study the impact of each aspect of identity upon themselves and others with the communities in which they live, learn, and work.
Student-Athletes Equally Supporting Others
Student-Athletes Equally Supporting Others (SAESO) organization meets once a month and focuses on inclusion, education, service, and social interactions between UW-Madison students and student athletes. In addition, SAESO aims to enhance the knowledge and experiences of UW-Madison student-athletes by providing events, forums, and programming which encourages social interaction between student-athletes, UW-Madison student body, and the Madison community at large.
Study jam with CeO
ACTS sponsors Study jams for CeO and their students on a bi-weekly basis. Provides academic support to students in various STEM courses and some campus resources.
Summer Education Research Program
The SERP program is a ten-week summer research program were participant receives guidance from a faculty mentor on his/her/their chosen research topic, engages in weekly seminars and activities with other students and mentors, and prepares and presents a paper on their research topic at the end of the program. Students submit their final paper and presentation to their faculty mentor and SERP staff. In addition, SERP covers participants' room and board and each participant receives a stipend up to $3000.00. For out-of-state participants, travel arrangements are also covered by SERP. The SERP participants live on campus, attend a cultural field trip, have access to University facilities such as libraries, computer labs, writing labs, and recreational facilities, as well as interact with other UW-Madison summer research opportunity program students for various social and professional activities such as the Graduate Fair/Panel and Picnic.
Summer Education Research Program
The Summer Education Research Program (SERP) is sponsored by the School of Education and the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Graduate School. The program provides underrepresented undergraduate students interested in pursuing graduate studies in the academic fields within the School of Education a valuable opportunity to engage in ten weeks of independent research guided by a faculty mentor. During the ​ten–week, residential program, SERP scholars attend a weekly research seminar to help guide their research projects, meet with their assigned faculty mentors, and prepare to present their research papers to the university community at the conclusion of the program. In addition to receiving a stipend, free room and board, and travel arrangements, SERP participants also attend cultural events and field trips in the greater-Madison region to understand what living in Madison, WI might be like as future graduate students.
Supermercado Latinx
This year marks the 9th Annual SuperMercado Latinx! Please join the men of Lambda Theta Phi Gamma Theta Chapter in one of the largest gatherings of Latinx/multicultural students and faculty at UW Madison. Various student and community organizations will be in attendance tabling along with other activities. Gordon Commons and Event Center, 2nd Floor. 5-8 p.m. Cost: Free.
Supporting Latinx Students at UW-Milwaukee and Marquette
Join ​WISCAPE for a discussion with Jac​queline Black (Marquette) and Alberto Jose Maldonado (UW-Milwaukee) about their campuses' initiatives to support Latin@ students and their shared goal of becoming Hispanic Serving Institutions over the next decade. This event is cosponsored by LACIS and the Chican@ and Latin@ Studies Program at UW-Madison. Wisconsin Idea Room, Education Building. 12-1:30 p.m. Cost: Free. Information: 265-6636, kadickinson@wisc.edu
Talk and Tamales
Talk with Laila el-Haddad and her new book, Gaza Kitchen
Teaching Inclusively and Equitably Workshop Series
This multi-part workshop series is designed to help campus faculty and instructional staff learn how to use inclusive teaching practices in their classrooms and other educational settings. Workshops focus on the experiences of students from underrepresented groups on the UW-Madison campus, the impact of instructor and student identity on learning, inclusive teaching approaches, and how to advocate for broader systemic and institutional change. The workshops are designed to function as a catalyst to stimulate further discussion and action within schools and colleges. In addition the programming uses applied improvisational theatre techniques to safely hold participants in a productive learning space as they practice responses to address incidents of bias or microaggressions.
The Jones Family Singers
Performance
The Red Turtle
International Movie offered at the Marquee at Union South
Tomorrow's Educators for Equity in Madison
Prepares MMSD high school students for college and teaching careers.
Tomorrow's Educators for Equity in Madison
Prepares MMSD high school students for college and teaching careers.
Topics in LGBTQ Health
Interprofessional elective course regarding LGBTQ health and well-being from health and social science perspectives.
Trans Health For Medical Providers
Update medical providers regarding routine medical services for trans population
Trans Monologues and Gender Spectrum Open Mic
Come listen to the voices of Madison's transgender and gender-variant community, who will share experiences navigating society's rigid gender norms as they intersect with other identities such as race, class, age and disability. After the event, the Mad City Sisters will host a Transgender Day of Remembrance vigil honoring trans and gender-nonconforming people who have lost their lives to transphobia.
Translation and Interpretation Services
Translation and interpretation services into English, Spanish, Hmong, Chinese, and Tibetan to facilitate communication in the workplace.
Trauma Informed Services Training
Trauma Informed Services training provided at All-Team Meeting by Angela Willits with the Department of Social Work. Discussed the causes and manifestations of PTSD and trauma as well as how we can improve our services to students and each other by using a trauma informed lens.
Treat Yo Self Tuesday
Tu Voz
Part of the Dine and Dialogue series we will have conversations around media representation, identity polities, and a general discussion about what does it mean to be Latinx. This space is intended for Latinx community members. Multicultural Student Center, Red Gym. 6-7:30 p.m. Cost: Free.
Undergraduate Advising Conference
Presented a workshop at the 2017 Advising Conference on, "Cultural considerations when advising Hmong undergraduate students".
Unwelcome Americans: Racial Profiling in a Post-9/11 Era
discussion
UW Odyssey Project
UW Odyssey Project
UW Odyssey Project - Odyssey Junior
The life-changing Odyssey Project (www.odyssey.wisc.edu) has a proven 14-year track record of empowering adults of color near the poverty level to overcome adversity and achieve dreams through higher education. Through Odyssey nearly 400 low-income adults have rediscovered the joy of learning and dozens have earned associates, bachelor’s and even master’s degrees. Because breaking the cycle of generational poverty involves whole families, Odyssey Junior was established in 2015 in South Madison on the same night as the adult course. Odyssey Junior offers a free program to 50 children ages 2 to 18, focused on literacy and self-exploration through creative writing, art, music, theatre, journalism, and scientific experimentation.
UW Odyssey Project - Odyssey Junior
UW Odyssey Project - Odyssey Junior
UW Odyssey Project - Onward Odyssey
UW Odyssey Project - Onward Odyssey
UW Skin Disease Research Center collaboration with WISELI Celebrating Women in Science and Engineering Grant
The University of Wisconsin, Department of Dermatology, Skin Disease Research Center (UW SDRC), in collaboration with WISELI through support from the Celebrating Women in Science and Engineering Grant, hosted Alice Pentland, MD, Chair and Professor of Dermatology at the University of Rochester, to give a research seminar on her current studies open to all UW faculty, staff and students. In addition, UW SDRC hosted a discussion session with Dr. Pentland for UW Dermatology PhD students, Scientists, Post-doctoral trainees and Residents regarding gender and careers in science and medicine.
UW Skin Disease Research Center collaboration with WISELI Celebrating Women in Science and Engineering Grant
The University of Wisconsin, Department of Dermatology, Skin Disease Research Center (UW SDRC), in collaboration with WISELI through support from the Celebrating Women in Science and Engineering Grant, hosted Maria Hordinsky, MD, Chair and Professor of Dermatology at the University of Minnesota, to give a research seminar on her current studies open to all UW faculty, staff and students. In addition, UW SDRC hosted a discussion session with Dr. Hordinsky for UW Dermatology PhD students, Scientists, Post-doctoral trainees and Residents regarding gender and careers in science and medicine.
UW-Madison SBDC Youth Entrepreneur Camp
Youth Entrepreneur Commuter Day Camp for Middle School aged kids. Part of the Pre-college programs at UW-Madison. Provided by the Small Business Development Center located within the WI School of Business. It is a 5 day program that includes creating a business, learning business basics, learning business operations with a game based activity, field trips, guest speakers, a team lemonade stand competition, creating business cards and giving business presentations (both poster and oral).
UW-Madison SBDC Youth Entrepreneur Camp
Youth Entrepreneur Commuter Day Camp for Middle School aged kids. Part of the Pre-college programs at UW-Madison. Provided by the Small Business Development Center located within the WI School of Business. It is a 5 day program that includes creating a business, learning business basics, learning business operations with a game based activity, field trips, guest speakers, a team lemonade stand competition, creating business cards and giving business presentations (both poster and oral).
UW-Madison Small Business Development Center - Youth Entrepreneur Camp
Youth Entrepreneur Commuter Day Camp for Middle-School aged kids. June 17-21, 2019. Kids start their own business, learn business basics, run business simulations, run a team lemonade stand competition and give business presentations. DPI scholarships and SBDC scholarships are accepted for free or reduced hot lunch students.
UW-Madison Small Business Development Center - Youth Entrepreneur Camp
Youth Entrepreneur Commuter Day Camp for Middle-School aged kids. June 17-21, 2019. Kids start their own business, learn business basics, run business simulations, run a team lemonade stand competition and give business presentations. DPI scholarships and SBDC scholarships are accepted for free or reduced hot lunch students.
Veterinary Students as One in Culture and Ethnicity
VOICE is part of a national movement to give veterinary medical students appreciation for people of all cultures and backgrounds
Veterinary Students as One in Culture and Ethnicity
VOICE is part of a national movement to give veterinary medical students appreciation for people of all cultures and backgrounds
Voices for Change Series
film series
Volunteer Tutoring Program
The volunteer tutoring program matches employees with tutors who provide one-on-one instruction. learners can pursue individual learning goals at convenient times and locations. Tutor training certificate is offered every semester.
Way Up: Multicultural Organization Festival
Way Up: Multicultural Organization Festival
We the 350: Stories of Poverty, Racism and Incarceration in Wisconsin
lecture/discussion
White Privilege 101
Wholistic Wed Series
William H. Hastie Fellowship Program
The Hastie Fellowship Program encourages scholarship in the full range of law studies, including law as related to minorities. The strong Wisconsin tradition for studies of the law in action and for interdisciplinary work creates a particularly supportive atmosphere for those with these interests. Candidates are encouraged to take full advantage of long-established ties between the law faculty and faculty in other disciplines, and they will have easy access to the vast resources of the entire University. Each Hastie fellow, before beginning work, establishes a relationship with a faculty member who will serve as the fellow's principal research advisor, guiding the fellow's research project. The fellow may also be paired with a second mentor, and has many opportunities to engage with additional members of the faculty. Because the Hastie Fellowship is also an LL.M. program, the Fellow must prepare a thesis that meets the requirements of the Graduate Committee of the Law School. Typically, the thesis is the basis for one or more publishable articles that the fellow prepares for entry into the law teaching market. Another important aspect of the Hastie Fellowship Program is helping each fellow develop strong teaching skills. Throughout the Fellowship, fellows are teamed with teachers covering subjects of interest to the fellow. This allows the fellow to observe and assist in teaching. Whenever possible, in the final semester of the program, the Hastie fellow will have the opportunity to teach a course or seminar in an area of interest to the fellow. Fellows are encouraged to become involved in the life of the law school by attending colloquia, faculty meetings, and social gatherings; engaging with the many scholars and public officials who visit at the school each year; participating in student-sponsored activities; and simply joining in the oftentimes rich exchanges that occur over lunch or morning coffee. The Hastie fellow is treated more as a junior colleague than as a graduate student.
William H. Hastie Fellowship Program
The Hastie Fellowship Program encourages scholarship in the full range of law studies, including law as related to minorities. The strong Wisconsin tradition for studies of the law in action and for interdisciplinary work creates a particularly supportive atmosphere for those with these interests. Candidates are encouraged to take full advantage of long-established ties between the law faculty and faculty in other disciplines, and they will have easy access to the vast resources of the entire University. Each Hastie fellow, before beginning work, establishes a relationship with a faculty member who will serve as the fellow's principal research advisor, guiding the fellow's research project. The fellow may also be paired with a second mentor, and has many opportunities to engage with additional members of the faculty. Because the Hastie Fellowship is also an LL.M. program, the Fellow must prepare a thesis that meets the requirements of the Graduate Committee of the Law School. Typically, the thesis is the basis for one or more publishable articles that the fellow prepares for entry into the law teaching market. Another important aspect of the Hastie Fellowship Program is helping each fellow develop strong teaching skills. Throughout the Fellowship, fellows are teamed with teachers covering subjects of interest to the fellow. This allows the fellow to observe and assist in teaching. Whenever possible, in the final semester of the program, the Hastie fellow will have the opportunity to teach a course or seminar in an area of interest to the fellow. Fellows are encouraged to become involved in the life of the law school by attending colloquia, faculty meetings, and social gatherings; engaging with the many scholars and public officials who visit at the school each year; participating in student-sponsored activities; and simply joining in the oftentimes rich exchanges that occur over lunch or morning coffee. The Hastie fellow is treated more as a junior colleague than as a graduate student.
Wisconsin Union E.I.D Council and Leadership Team Retreat
members of the Union's Engagement, Inclusion and Diversity Committee meet twice a years for a retreat with the Union's Leadership Team
Wisconsin Union E.I.D Council Meeting
formed E.I.D Council for the Wisconsin Union
WISELI Searching for Excellence and Diversity training session
This WISELI training session was required for all chairs of search committees. This helps the ongoing dialog within departments to recognized and honor the diversity (racial/ethnic, cultural, gender, sexual orientation and identity) of colleagues within the department, and ensuring that value and strength of diversity continues with future recruitment and hiring practices
WLLC
The WLLC includes vice provosts, deans, faculty members and diversity program administrators who believe that being in community with other white colleagues to collectively look at our socialization and issues of our own privileged positions can play an important role in our collective leadership efforts. We have committed to coming together to be in dialogue every-other Friday morning. The WLLC borrows key frameworks from the Leadership Institute, including the Johari Window, Appreciative Inquiry, Quadrant Behavior Theory as well as essential readings such as “The Cycle of Socialization” and “Habits that Block Conversation.” In addition to these key ingredients, the WLLC also follows the LI arc of Self-to-self, self-to-other, and self-to system with a set of guiding questions that help the dialogue stay focused on investigating our whiteness. Given the leadership focus of our group, we threat throughout the conversation our practice of what it means to lead as white people at a PWI with a declared interest in building a welcoming and inclusive campus and community environment that leverages the voices and experiences of each of us. Participation is by invitation.
WLLC
The WLLC includes vice provosts, deans, faculty members and diversity program administrators who believe that being in community with other white colleagues to collectively look at our socialization and issues of our own privileged positions can play an important role in our collective leadership efforts. We have committed to coming together to be in dialogue every-other Friday morning. The WLLC borrows key frameworks from the Leadership Institute, including the Johari Window, Appreciative Inquiry, Quadrant Behavior Theory as well as essential readings such as “The Cycle of Socialization” and “Habits that Block Conversation.” In addition to these key ingredients, the WLLC also follows the LI arc of Self-to-self, self-to-other, and self-to system with a set of guiding questions that help the dialogue stay focused on investigating our whiteness. Given the leadership focus of our group, we threat throughout the conversation our practice of what it means to lead as white people at a PWI with a declared interest in building a welcoming and inclusive campus and community environment that leverages the voices and experiences of each of us. Participation is by invitation.
Women in Science and Engineering Leadership Institute
The Women in Science & Engineering Leadership Institute (WISELI) is a research center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. WISELI was formed in 2002 with funding from the National Science Foundation’s ADVANCE: Institutional Transformation program. The center is currently funded with a combination of: contributions from eight UW-Madison schools, colleges, or units; grant funding from national scientific funding agencies; gift funds; and funds earned through WISELI’s income-generating activities. WISELI also disseminates “best practices” in gender equity programming and measurement. Our workshops and materials are in demand by colleges and universities nationally and internationally.
Women of Color Week
Workplace English Language Learning Classes
Workplace English Language Learning Classes are offered for limited English - proficient employees in participating departments.
World Aids Day: Social Justice Workshop
World Music Festival Diversity Leaders Reception
A partnership between DDEEA and the Union to have a reception for campus partners from diverse backgrounds related to their work on the World Music Festival held at Memorial Union.
YOGA-Every-BODY
to promote healthy body, mind for all DDEEA Students followed by study jam

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